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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I haven't had access to a computer in a while, but I asked about a blower motor here before and people were very kind and helpful.

I haven now replaced the blower motor and run capacitor (single phase).
Before, the only thing that would turn on when the thermostat was set to anything (including fan setting), the only thing that would turn on in the HVAC was the furnace motor that basically pumps out excess heat. The condenser fan and the blower motor were both silent.

Now, when I switched it on the first time after installing the new fan and capacitor, everything booted up like it should! The condenser fan and blower motor both kicked on. However, after about 10 seconds, the blower motor stopped. The condenser fan has no problem kicking on though. This makes me think (albeit with very limited knowledge in HVAC) that it had something to do with a bad run capacitor, since the condenser fan now starts up no problem. Still, I don't know what to do with the blower motor.

Does anyone know what might be the problem? Why it would start and then stop like that? Contacter issue? Wiring issue? Some sensor went off inside the motor?

It's a York D1NA042N05606C HVAC. I replaced the blower motor and run capacitor from parts that RepairClinic deemed as the correct replacement parts for my model (they look the same but different brand).

Thanks in advance,
Eric
 

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Could be a control board issue.

Is the new motor the correct voltage.
 

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Are you trying to start the air conditioner when the condenser fan starts up?
Is there voltage on the blower outputs on the board? Is it the correct voltage for the motor? Is the capacitor good? Motor thermal switch opening?
 

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I would guess now that while the repairman charged $500 for the repair you might be starting to understand why.

parts : $XXX
labor to replace part: $XXX

Knowledge to know what and how to fix it; priceless


If the motor makes no noise, at all, I would suspect no power to the motor before claiming the motor is bad. Unless a motor is smoked very badly they usually make some humming or similar noises when energized.

So, to check to motor I would disconnect it and simply run jumpers to the leads providing the appropriate voltage. Make sure both the new motor and old motor are listed on the data tag as the same voltage. You will have to find a power source to do this. If the supply voltage to the unit matches the fan voltage you can tap into the branch circuit.

If either is rated as dual voltage you need to verify what you equipment voltage is and make sure the motor was properly connected for that voltage.

While you have it disconnected I would turn on the "fan only" setting on the furnace to make sure there is voltage being supplied to the motor output from the furnace control system.

Obviously all of this requires due csution appropriate for working with live circuits.

Once you get results, post them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Now I'm thinking it may be a control board issue.

Today I went back up and checked all the wiring, and I don't know how I missed it before, but the back of the circuit board is fried. Two of the terminals are smoked up too. It's between the HUM port (which has nothing connected) and the L1 port. The two in between are fried and I don't know what ports they are because the board is too damaged to see.

YET, the repairman tech that came didn'tsee this or didn't figure this was a problem. And here's the kicker: this same company already replaced the same board about a year ago. I'm no genius with HVAC, but I know computers and know that when I fried my motherboard before, you don't just throw in a new motherboard; you get a new power supply as well, because you need to fix what fried the board. If this board was fried twice in a little over a year, I suspect something else is wrong. Still, why would the blower motor kick on at first when I first connected it?

I'm attaching a picture of the board. Maybe someone can tell me if this would indeed affect the blower motor.

 

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maybe this is new damage. Maybe the motor was bad and when you put it in, it worked but something else fried.


have you verified motor supply voltage rating matches the motor voltage rating? Is the motor a dual voltage motor? If so, is it wired for the proper voltage?

I would also try to look up that specific control board and try to find out what the leads involved in the burn are. That may give you a clue as to the real issue.

I tried to look up the board by the furnace model number and any board I saw was different than the one you have shown here.
 

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that looks like extensive damage to the board..fried from L 1, ind terminal, clear behind the relay...very hard to miss if troubleshooting...my guess something happened when you installed the new motor... and from the looks of things that would explain why you have no power to motor but that don't explain how it happen yet.. i also see the spade connector on the unused motor leads burn't...?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was afraid I blew something, but luckily, I did take pictures of the board for configuration purposes, before removing the old motor. I found that it was also fried in that picture too, so it wasn't my wiring that fried it as I changed nothing when the old motor was in, the unused port was also burned in the earlier pic as well. So again, I don't believe this is my doing, but something faulty in the system that's frying the board; this is the second time in a little over a year. The voltage on the new motor and capacitor is the same.

The board actually is tilted back and behind all of the cords, it is pretty easy to overlook that burn, because there are a lot of cords and other parts obscuring it. I also said in my last post, the repair tech who came out to fix it was literally on the roof for about 3 minutes, never looked at the blower motor (I know because with my model the fuse box is mounted to the side so you have to remove that and about 10 screws to get to the blower, he would have been up there longer had he checked). Needless to say, it didn't seem like he did a very in-depth checkup which was why I was so skeptical of him.

And in regards to Nap: I know, the board is different from the one we have. This is simply the board the repair techs installed last year for my parents. They also charged over $500 for this despite that the install took them less than 20 minutes and the part is listed as $185. +$315 service call is a bit much for such a quick call, but I do believe we have a lifetime warranty on the board, so we'll be calling them on this.

Is it possible that another component in the HVAC power supply is blowing up the circuit board?
 

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My first thoughts would be a broken solder connection on one of those lugs or the spade lug connection is too loose. Very common problem and will generate a lot of heat.

I'm also seeing water corrosion around the square chip below the relay. Is this board in a location where water can drip on it?

Pull the board and have a good close look at it. There are a lot of clues here to help determine the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hm, I'll look into this tomorrow morning (I'm in CA).

As for the water part: it's on the roof, and the first time I pulled off the panel that exposes the blower, the blower motor actually had condensation on it. And it wasn't particularly cold out, so I don't know what caused that. The board is sealed inside the HVAC though, so I don't think water would be able to drip on it, just condensation from rain might be able to get to it. I'll take a deeper look at it in the morning.

Thanks for the help thus far everyone!
 

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And in regards to Nap: I know, the board is different from the one we have. This is simply the board the repair techs installed last year for my parents. They also charged over $500 for this despite that the install took them less than 20 minutes and the part is listed as $185. +$315 service call is a bit much for such a quick call, but I do believe we have a lifetime warranty on the board, so we'll be calling them on this.

Is it possible that another component in the HVAC power supply is blowing up the circuit board?
I was just trying to figure out what terminals were toasted and using the model and such came up with a different board. Figured you could use the numbers off your board to find out what terminals are toast.

and great on the board warranty

make sure you keep those pics that show the burns before you changed the blower. They may want to claim you toasted it when you changed the motor.

as to is it possible? anything is possible.
 
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