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Discussion Starter #1
I've been in this small 50s ranch for 3 years. I had an engineer out to examine a bowed wall, and while he was here, I asked about removing a basement wall.

The wall was partially exposed at that time, and I questioned the doubled 2x4s that were in the corner of the wall. His assement was they probably added them because the previous owners experienced some bounce/flex in the floor.

However upon removing the walls completely, it appears there was once a steel column in place a foot away. You can see the unpainted rectangle on the beam as well as a slightly humped section of floor directly beneath.

The wall has been out almost a year now but I am concerned about the structural integrity of the 2x4s. I am continuing the basement remodel and wondering if I should have a support put back in that original spot and remove the 2x4s (If so, what kind of support?) or if it's okay to leave well enough alone.

Any ideas/advice?
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
It's a single story ranch on a 30 ft 4"x8" I-beam. There are no steel posts. The one that appears to be missing was 10ft in from the wall. The other side has a similar wood framed wall 10ft in. (post possibly removed there as well)
 

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DIY Your Own Air Bed
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It's called a lally column for residential basements. Yes, put one below the beam ideally where it was originally so you don't need to worry about the bearing/footing
 

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retired framer
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Discussion Starter #5
Appreciate the advice so far...

I attached another image.

I used my cup grinder to get rid of the glue and top layer of concrete expecting to see the remnants of a cut off post, but there is none.

With no holes in that unpainted spot on the beam, is it possible the column wasn't there or there never was one at all?
 

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retired framer
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I doubt very much you would have those hints, that you should ignore.
Often the house is built before that floor is put in the original post could have been on a little concrete pier that may have been removed. Or on a hole that was filled.


The floor is 4" thick and there would be footing below the floor for the post.
So where the post belongs the concrete will be much thicker, up to 12"
 

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It's called a lally column for residential basements. Yes, put one below the beam ideally where it was originally so you don't need to worry about the bearing/footing
You'd want one that has a threaded insert so you can put in in place and adjust it's height as required. (I didn't want OP to buy a 10-
' cement filled 3" iron pipe and then have to figure out how to cut it and get it into place).

OP - see the pictures... from Home Depot
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You'd want one that has a threaded insert so you can put in in place and adjust it's height as required. (I didn't want OP to buy a 10-
' cement filled 3" iron pipe and then have to figure out how to cut it and get it into place).

OP - see the pictures... from Home Depot
That is a temporary post. To my understanding, even the mono posts with the adjustable bottom like the one attached here aren't okay unless they are cemented into the ground.

I think I'll need a fixed one that can be bolted to the floor and attached to the I beam somehow. Still trying to figure out if there's a way without drilling through the steel beam.
 

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retired framer
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That is a temporary post. To my understanding, even the mono posts with the adjustable bottom like the one attached here aren't okay unless they are cemented into the ground.

I think I'll need a fixed one that can be bolted to the floor and attached to the I beam somehow. Still trying to figure out if there's a way without drilling through the steel beam.
A wood post has to be sized to the load (engineer) and then it still needs to be bolted to the floor and the beam.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm not sure how I would attach a 6x6 to the 4" steel beam...

I found an adjustable lally post that fits. I've read I could screw this down to the footing and I would be in the clear as long as I had the threads welded after install. And for the top, I guess I have to drill holes through the I beam to mount the top plate?

Anyone have any better suggestions?

Tiger Brand 6 ft. 9 in. Adjustable Steel Building Support Column 3 in. O.D.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Tiger-B...ing-Support-Column-3-in-O-D-3A-6971/202222921
 

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I'm not sure how I would attach a 6x6 to the 4" steel beam...

I found an adjustable lally post that fits. I've read I could screw this down to the footing and I would be in the clear as long as I had the threads welded after install. And for the top, I guess I have to drill holes through the I beam to mount the top plate?

Anyone have any better suggestions?

Tiger Brand 6 ft. 9 in. Adjustable Steel Building Support Column 3 in. O.D.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Tiger-B...ing-Support-Column-3-in-O-D-3A-6971/202222921
If the are going to weld the threads, they can weld the top plate in place - so you only need to hold the top plate temporarily with a C clamp until you have the pole set to height.
 
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