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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have this on my bathroom wall:

Rectangle Font Electronic device Symmetry Metal


I want to replace the left switch with this:

Gas Font Auto part Machine Rolling


this dual switch will control the original two circuits (bathroom light and fan)

and meanwhile, I will install a normal receptacle on the right side:

Rectangle Circuit component Electronic device Font Machine



In principle is there any reason why I can't/shouldn't do this as a DIYer?

I know the basics of circuits and how to rewire it ("always switch hot")

This is my bathroom layout. Code in my area says GFCI required if within 1.5m to a water source, which this outlet is not. (unless you count the toilet bowl?)

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Is your sketch maybe not quite accurate? The blue arrows that I’ve shown are 1.5m long (scaled from the 164” measurement).

It’s not a bad idea to have a GFCI outlet, even if it is not required by code. Maybe someone will keep a short extension cord permanently attached to a hair dryer so that it can be used at the mirror over the sink. But, there is probably an existing receptacle there? If so I’m curious of the rationale to add one by the door.

Adding a receptacle will add one device to the (normally) 12 that you’re allowed on that 15A circuit, so it would be a good idea to count them up first.

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My question is the colour of the wires going to the switches. If both switches have a black and white going to the screws, you likely would not have a neutral for an outlet.
If the switches have 2 blacks each with the whites all in a nut in the back you would be in luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Is your sketch maybe not quite accurate? The blue arrows that I’ve shown are 1.5m long (scaled from the 164” measurement).

It’s not a bad idea to have a GFCI outlet, even if it is not required by code. Maybe someone will keep a short extension cord permanently attached to a hair dryer so that it can be used at the mirror over the sink. But, there is probably an existing receptacle there? If so I’m curious of the rationale to add one by the door.

Adding a receptacle will add one device to the (normally) 12 that you’re allowed on that 15A circuit, so it would be a good idea to count them up first.

View attachment 673572
The reason to add a receptacle by the door is so I can plug in a small wall lamp that the kids can reach easily to turn on at night.

I see your arrows but I was assuming the faucet itself (the "water source") was the thing that you measure to.

There is a GFCI outlet beside the sink.
 

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I see your arrows but I was assuming the faucet itself (the "water source") was the thing that you measure to.
It's one of my pet peeves that there isn't free online access to the Canadian Electrical Code, so I can't quote the applicable section, but I'm confident the the 1.5 meter distance is from the sink/bathub/shower, not where the water enters the fixture.
 

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It's one of my pet peeves that there isn't free online access to the Canadian Electrical Code, so I can't quote the applicable section, but I'm confident the the 1.5 meter distance is from the sink/bathub/shower, not where the water enters the fixture.
In the US correct it is the water line not the inflow point. Tub edge not fill fixture, idea is to keep handheld stuff away from any water.
 

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"The water spigot" would be a random and senseless rule, made up by stupid government bureaucrats.

The core issue at hand is that most things come with 6' or 2m of cord, and GFCI protection is warranted if that would give them enough cord length to be dropped into a basin of water, be it the sink, toilet or tub.

So a sensible rule actually tuned to save lives would be within 6'+margin of any basin.
 

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The NEC already has this covered by requiring all receptacles in the bathroom to be gfi protected.
 

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Is your sketch maybe not quite accurate? The blue arrows that I’ve shown are 1.5m long (scaled from the 164” measurement).

It’s not a bad idea to have a GFCI outlet, even if it is not required by code. Maybe someone will keep a short extension cord permanently attached to a hair dryer so that it can be used at the mirror over the sink. But, there is probably an existing receptacle there? If so I’m curious of the rationale to add one by the door.

Adding a receptacle will add one device to the (normally) 12 that you’re allowed on that 15A circuit, so it would be a good idea to count them up first.

View attachment 673572
Depending on the age of the house or bathroom wiring, the bathroom might be on its own circuit, and if he lucks out that there is a neutral in the box, there's a chance it might come from the other outlet which is already protected. If this switch is the feed point, he could swap the GFCI to this location.
 
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