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Discussion Starter #1
We purchased a home with a finished basement that we later found out had an outside faucet break which flooded the place. The "contractor" cut the drywall from the floor up to about 24" and then taped. Unfortunately, all rooms show this lousey tape and cut job to varying degrees.

My two thoughts are to cut out the drywall to the first seam, which is 4' from the floor and replace with a new piece and then retape. My second thought is to feather out the hump with new mud to create an illusion of a smooth flat surface. Otherwise, I am tempted to redo one room a year from the floor up to get this place done right.

We used a satin paint finish on the walls when we moved in and it is not too forgiving depending on the lighting.

Any thoughts?

Mike:(
 

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Sounds like replacing the bottom panel would be the easiest route. There are a lot of tutorials on taping and mudding. And no, paint won't fix a bad repair job. Just do it right and be done with it. It's usually the fastest solution in the long run.
 

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A picture would be nice.
If it's just a bad tape joint why replace the whole sheet instead of just cutting and redoing the tape?
 
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If you do choose to remove only part of the wall---do not break it back to an old seam---that will already have a hump of mud from the original taping---making the new joint higher and very hard to hide---

Best is to make a fresh cut in an area that does not have an existing seam.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Clarification on Drywall Repair

Hey Guys,

It was suggested that I make a new cut above the old tape job and go from there. Do you mean that I should make the cut anywhere (and remove the drywall) or just redo the old seam?

The drywall is good from the point above the cut to the ceiling. If I were to repair this job when the water damage first occured, I would have just make a cut where the two sheets of drywall join, which is a lightly rounded edge 4' from the floor. The contractor wanted to save money and instead cut as low as possible.

BTW, a picture won't do justice to the job since the bumps are only usually visible during various types of lighting and time of day.

It looks like I will have to remove baseboard around the room if I want to replace a quarter of the sheet or use the thinest tape I can find and redo the old joint.

Your thoughts,

Mike
 

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Just my opinion but the reason there is a hump now is because he created a large butt joint. To cut above the seam would create another butt joint. A butt joint is the hardest thing to tape and make disappear. It can be done but I have a 12" 14" and a 16" trowel sometimes I need to go 16" on both sides of the joint to make it completely disappear.
As far as just removing the bottom piece at the joint, I would try it. Simply because it may work. The difference will be when you take the bottom off and the tape pulls off, how much of the dried mud comes off the seam. If enough comes off to give you a taper it can be fixed pretty easy. This you can try pretty easy if it doesn't work then just replace it.
I just reread your last post, if the hump is small enough you only see it in certain light then I would get at least a 12" drywall knife and re-mud it. Really just feathering it out a little farther.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Good advice

Toolseeker,

I haven't tryed to make better a drywall job before, but your suggestions and those of others is worth the try. I can't think it would be any worse,

Since it would be a shame to remove the baseboard to replace a four foot section of drywall, I will do some cosmetic surgery on the hump and see if I can imporove the appearance. I will purchase a 12" drywall trowel and see what I can accomplish.

I see both sides of these suggestions and either way one goes can create more problems since I am a novice, but not afraid to try.

Thanks,

Mike

PS I will let you know how it comes out.:)
 

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Let me make a couple suggestions. Place your 12" knife or trowel (flat not curved) on the crown of the joint (high spot). Rock the knife side to side this will give you an idea of how much you need to fill. Put no mud on the crown, but on both sides of it. Then with your knife edge on the crown and the othe corner on the wall and your knife at about a 45 degree angle pull the mud off leaving a small amount in the void. Do this on both sides of the crown. Now comes the hard part, Let it dry completely, if it's not you will pull the mud back off and have to do it over. You may need to do this a couple times till it's level. When you can put your knife on it and it doesn't rock or you can't see light under it your good to go.
Keep us posted.
 

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If you do remove the whole bottom sheet up to the original tapered seem, then use a wet sponge on the compound in the taper to clear it out. Assuming they used regular compound it will come off. Then you can install a tapered edge against it and have a perfect finish because you're basically starting from scratch. You'll have to remove the paint on the joint first, though some paint will come off with a wet sponge as well.
 

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I would lay a level across the joint,move it from one end of the wall to the other end.This will tell you where the high spot is by the scuff mark of the level.mud above and below this scuff mark until its level,then a slight skim.When dry ,sand and paint.
 
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