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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This was 1" PVC coming out of the well. I mistakenly thought the house needed 3/4" CPVC at the time. I now know that it needs 1" CPVC.

So I mistakenly reduced this to 3/4" and then converted it to CPVC. Is there a way to remove these fittings other than just cutting? I could cut that piece of 3/4" PVC and expand it back up to 1" before converting to CPVC again, but that is needlessly complicated and may cause a failed inspection.
 

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It is a solvent type of glue. The pipes actually fuse together. Sometimes but not often a heat gun can make a joint soft to the point it will pull apart but it might damage the pipe. In a pressure application I would not heat it. If you cut right next to a fitting there is a tool that will cut the remaining stub out of the fitting. You have to be able to get it in there mounted to a drill. I would cut it back as far as necessary to make it right with new parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It is a solvent type of glue. The pipes actually fuse together. Sometimes but not often a heat gun can make a joint soft to the point it will pull apart but it might damage the pipe. In a pressure application I would not heat it. If you cut right next to a fitting there is a tool that will cut the remaining stub out of the fitting. You have to be able to get it in there mounted to a drill. I would cut it back as far as necessary to make it right with new parts.
Ok. Any idea what the name of that tool is?
 

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PVC can be used for cold water only. PVC cannot be exposed to the ultraviolet rays of the sun. CPVC must be used for hot water. If CPVC can be used here the conversion must be made under ground. The only way to convert from PVC to CPVC is by installing the appropriate glue on threaded adapters. PVC and CPVC cannot be joined together directly using glue. Transition must be made underground or interior to the building. Assuming CPVC is approved for exterior use exposed to sunlight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
PVC can be used for cold water only. PVC cannot be exposed to the ultraviolet rays of the sun. CPVC must be used for hot water. If CPVC can be used here the conversion must be made under ground. The only way to convert from PVC to CPVC is by installing the appropriate glue on threaded adapters. PVC and CPVC cannot be joined together directly using glue. Transition must be made underground or interior to the building. Assuming CPVC is approved for exterior use exposed to sunlight.
This PVC is straight from the well installer, and they're the biggest well installer in town. So I assume they know what they're doing.

If you say PVC can't be exposed to Sun, then why wait until it's underground to convert? Why not right away as soon as it exits well? What's the logic in transitioning underground?
 

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PVC and CPVC will lose a little impact strength over time in sunlight. Sunlight will degrade 1 to 3 thousandths of an inch of the pipe surface and discolor it. Sunlight does not affect the tensile strength or the ability to handle pressure. PVC lasts for at least several years in sunlight, CPVC lasts for 50 to 75 years in sunlight. I would get a can of white spray paint for plastic and spray bomb the PVC part.
 
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