DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
how do i 'depressurize'...the exterior a/c unit. I have lost my house due to a bad roof from Sears and it rotted the front of my house and whole kitchen out. It will cost me more money to fix it than the property value. Please help...I'm going to store it until I can find a foreclosure to move into.
 

·
I'm Your Huckleberry
Joined
·
5,884 Posts
you're going to need a set of refrigerant gauges (make certain they are the correct refrigerant type to match your system, most likely R-22 or 410-A and they do make make gauges that can read both) and a service valve wrench to pump the system down.

What you do, after you have your gauges hooked up and the system is running, is close off the high side (the noticeably smaller of the two copper lines and the red side of the gauges/right side) and watch the blue/left/low pressure side) slowly come down. What you've done is not allow the vapor to go anywhere, trapping it in the compressor. Once the pressure drops to near zero on the blue gauge you close off the low side and shut the compressor off by the electrical disconnect or breaker.

Called 'pumping down'. Then you cut the copper lines loose with some tubing cutters.
 

·
Underwriter
Joined
·
96 Posts
how do i 'depressurize'...the exterior a/c unit. I have lost my house due to a bad roof from Sears and it rotted the front of my house and whole kitchen out. It will cost me more money to fix it than the property value. Please help...I'm going to store it until I can find a foreclosure to move into.

Call a lawyer? Sounds like Sears needs to repair you house for free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
615 Posts
Doc Holiday's info is good.Notice he said "cut" the lines with a tubing cutter. leave 6-8 inches if line for the reinstall and cutting it avoids the possibility of any oil catching fire if you try to debraze the connection.
The same for the evap coil.
On both sdides you should try to seal off as best you can to prevent any debris from getting into the tubes while it is in storage.
When unit is reinstalled you should install a new liquid line dryer and a suction line dryer to help prevent future problems with unit.
Now the important part.a/c units are not one size fits all aqnd if you don't have a load calc done on your new residence then you are just dumb.
Don't be dumb.Mis sized equipment costs you an extra fortune every time it comes on and with energy cost soaring it just doesn't make any reasonable sense.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
40,866 Posts
Actually. if its an R22 system, then Doc is forgetting to tell the OP. That the OP can't legally do this him/herself.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Doc Holliday

·
Hvac Pro
Joined
·
23,426 Posts
"Depressurize" it wrong, hookup the liquid line hose too slow or incorrectly and get a blast of liquid refrigerant in your eyes and go blind and somehow this DIY project may not seem so worthwhile.:whistling2:

Working with high pressure refrigerants that can seriously harm the inexperienced is a recipe for disaster IMO.
 

·
I'm Your Huckleberry
Joined
·
5,884 Posts
Actually. if its an R22 system, then Doc is forgetting to tell the OP. That the OP can't legally do this him/herself.
last time I said something about refrigerant on here it didn't turn out so pretty.

Yes, if it is refrigerant 22 than you must be EPA certified to handle any high pressure appliance (air conditioner) and it's refrigerant. If it is 410-A than you do not have to be certified as it's ozone 'friendly' although the pressures are near double that of the operating pressure of 22 so be careful and do some more research.

Yes, beenthere is always right. It's always good learning from him, almost feel like I should be paying him or something. :laughing:
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top