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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 19 year old 18 cf Kenmore/Frigidaire fridge. We bought at Sears Outlet store and it would not cool. Repairman came and found that freon lines were plugged up and he got them cleared and recharged it and it has worked great since then.....19 years.
I recently found that freezer was cold but not fridge.....coils were frozen over......heater checked out ok and after replacing defrost timer and thermostat on the coils, got that resolved.
But the temp in the fridge will not go below 43 and the freezer will not get colder than 24. I checked the thermostat with the thermocouple tube in the fridge and it checks ok......I bypassed it and temps did not get any cooler.

So I suspect compressor may need a little freon.
I have attached pix of the ports the repairman added 19 years ago and I am thinking I can use the port on the line that was used to add freon at the factory to add a little freon....can anyone tell me if I can use that port?
Thanks for reading!
 

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The first thing you need to know is what kind of refrigerant is in the system, since there are a few different ones. If it's truly freon (R-12), good luck trying to find it for less than the cost of a new fridge.



The second question you need to answer is whether it's low on refrigerant, or is the compressor worn out and not providing an adequate pressure differential.
 

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You will spend more on parts, supplies and time than the value of this appliance.
Suggestion: you decide if it's worth the efforts, otherwise get a new fridge.
4th of July sales are here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I understand the replies so far......except not an answer to my question.

So to let you know more, it is R-134A.

I live in a major metropolitan area with a very high number of Covid-19 infections. No store close to me has an 18 ft fridge in stock......and delivery is not even considered right now......curbside pickup if you order one.

I have the ability, the tools and the time as I have very little work.

If I can keep this fridge running a little longer it will be worth it. So far I have spent about $30 replacing the defrost timer and thermostat and solved the freezing up issue......and 2 hours of my time......but I have plenty of time right now.

Can anyone offer an answer to my question?
 

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With the compressor NOT running, connect your low side compound gauge to the valve that was added to the processor tube in the first picture, the tube that runs directly into the compressor housing. Once connected, and if positive pressure is shown, loosen the hose connection at the gauge manifold body and allow a small whiff of freon to escape so as to purge the line of air (a one second psst is enough). If there is no positive pressure there, wait longer until the cabinet warms up and it should go positive given time. It's important to purge the hose before doing anything further. Never break into a system that may be under vacuum... air will enter and you'll have a second problem.

Once you have succeeded in purging the hose, proceed as below.

Then with the unit running and stabilized at the lowest temperature it can get, record the gauge pressure and report back.
 
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Good... as mentioned before, if it goes into a vacuum while running, which it likely will, don't disconnect the hose or air will get in.

There is a possibility that you may have replaced the defrost timer with an incorrect type and both the compressor and defrost heater are being energized at the same time. Check that possibility before breaking into the system.

There are at least 3 different timer types and as many different numbering schemes. The important thing is that the switching is on the proper terminals. The most common arrangement has the switch contacts on the 3 grouped terminals with the common leg in the center (hot 120 vac line) and the normally open leg (defrost heater wire) on the end. The other 3 group terminal is the normally closed leg and goes to the compressor. The all alone single terminal is a neutral that connects to the timer motor inside.

That's for most Frigidaire and Amana cabinets. RCA and Kenmore, et al, use different types of timers so we need to be sure what you have before attacking the refrigeration system needlessly.
 
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Power it down and gas it up to 60# and soap bubble leak check with 50/50 dish soap and water solution. Watch the gauge for any reduction to get some idea of the leak rate. It is low on gas so there is a leak somewhere. Might be so slow you won't be able to find it... if so, then just gas it up and hope it lasts a long time.
 
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