DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I want to buy a reciprocating saw for trimming/cutting down some small trees and other projects around the house. I'm trying to decide if I should get a bosch 18v cordless

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc...keyword=bosch+reciprocating+saw&storeId=10051

or a corded orbital one like this:

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc...yword=reciprocating+saw+orbital&storeId=10051

Some of the branches are pretty large(8 inches thick) and I dont want to not have enough power so im leaning towards the corded one. However I already have a few bosch 18v tools and 3 battery packs so if that will get the job done I would rather have that one. Opinions?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,359 Posts
For what you’re wanting to do I’d get the Milwaukee. 8” is a pretty big branch for a sawzall but it will work.

Be sure to buy the actual “pruning blades”, even the normal wood blades will just gum up and not cut well on a branch that big.

You really should be using a chainsaw.
 

·
JOATMON
Joined
·
15,340 Posts
You want cordless.....makes it a lot easier when your climbing up in a tree...

Do you have any other cordless tools? If so, you want to stay in the same brand so you can use the same batteries.

I have the Ryobi....I've used the dog crap out of mine and it's still doing fine.

Like Kwick said...get the right blade....but you can get a good 12" pruning blade for just about all of them. I use mine all the time for cutting branches.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
I'd go cordless as I hate dragging cords around. Especially for trees where you may be out in the yard, up a ladder, at an awkward angle, etc. you will have to make sure you have a charged battery and you won't be using it all day but unless you're a pro it's doubtful you will be using it 8 hours straight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I use my recip saw for the same purposes all the time in my yard. Although I'm not cutting branches quite as thick as yours, my corded saw has done me fine. I've cut down small trees and 6" x 6"'s with it and I've never regretted getting a corded recip.

An 18V recip won't give you the same performance as a corded tool, and when the log binds on the blade you will find that the 18v tool will just bog where it will take more for that to happen to a corded tool. Also, the orbital action on a recip is a necessary feature. It really makes it easier to get through material.

Yes the cord can get in the way and can be a pain, but if you're not using it too often I would always go corded.

I hope this helps. Cheers and Merry Christmas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37,270 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
You really should be using a chainsaw.
:thumbsup:

Using a cordless saw to cut 8" thick, live tree branches is a good challenge for the tool and batteries. Better have an arm-powered hack saw handy in case you run out of batteries and can't finish cutting the branch.

Also be sure you know the correct way to cut tree branches. It is a lot easier if you do it right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
If you're only going to have one reciprocating saw, I would stick with corded. Especially if you only use it occasionally. Cordless are convenient when the battery is charged AND when the battery is still good AND when the job isn't that big. A corded one will always work.
Also if you think long term, corded is better. I bought my reciprocating saw over 25 years ago and will probably get another 25 years out of it. Granted, they didn't even have cordless ones then, but you get the point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,016 Posts
8" thick? I vote for chainsaw too.
I like the idea of getting new tools, but I already have a chainsaw and a corded sawzall ( yes it is a milwaukee) and the chainsaw gets the vote for outdoors all the time. even for small branches, when you have to plan every cut with a sawzall, its a pain. with the chainsaw, I just zip through my cuts without having to worry about binding too much. ( properly knowing how to cut a branch is important. for you AND for the tree)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
I love my orbital 3/4 stroke 18volt nicad v18 lithium ion milwaukee hatchet. I'm amazed at what it can cut through. Just use milwaukee 9 or 12 inch pruning blades. I also have a makita 4.5 inch 12 volt cordless chainsaw and a corded Husqvarna 316E corded 16 inch chainsaw. Both cut faster than a sawzall for limbs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,606 Posts
Local rental, get extendable trimmer. Has like a little chainsaw on the end, extends up to 17 feet then you don't even need the ladder.
 

·
journeyman carpenter
Joined
·
3,480 Posts
if your getting a recip to do this get the corded.. cordless recips only get about 5 minutes of cutting time out of a battery 10 tops and they cut about 1/2 as fast as a corded model. if you have quite a few branches to cut theres a good chance youll be standing around waiting for batteries to charge more than your actually cutting.

i have a makita 10 amp recip and the larger 15 amp avt.. the 15 amp is the best recip on the market. milwaukee was until " one world technologies" took over milwaukee.. we also have 2 of the 18 v makita cordless recips at work.. their toys in comparison
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,526 Posts
Buy a sawzall that is appropriate for your needs around the house. But spend $10 for a nice 24" bow saw for those little limbs.....or a cheap electric chain saw. If you "sap up" your reciprocal saw you will remember it everytime you use it....:)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,359 Posts
Of all the tools I use the Sawzall is way up on the list of most abused.

Cordless is great if you need to crawl into the hole or up the ladder for a cut or two but it’s far from a workhorse.

If you can only own one, then you need the cord, especially if you want to go logging with the thing. :wink:

Milwaukee has always been the leader in the Sawzall market and even though their Sawzall’s are not as bullet proof as they used to be there still the best out there imo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Looks like im getting a corded one. thanks for the replies. What is the "correct" way to cut tree branches and or cut down small trees?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Looks like im getting a corded one. thanks for the replies. What is the "correct" way to cut tree branches and or cut down small trees?
Well people on forums can argue about the "correct" way all day long, but for occasional trimming, I suggest by hand with a good quality pruning saw and bow saw.
I've never used my reciprocating saw for pruning, though I will admit I've used it to cut out some small weed trees and shrubs along the fence and house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Well people on forums can argue about the "correct" way all day long, but for occasional trimming, I suggest by hand with a good quality pruning saw and bow saw.
I've never used my reciprocating saw for pruning, though I will admit I've used it to cut out some small weed trees and shrubs along the fence and house.
YES! I've got a pretty nice pro chainsaw, but I still use a bow saw and pole saw for occasional limbing. They cut surprisingly fast. I can't see myself ever using a reciprocation saw for yardwork. As for felling, I've always used a chainsaw or ax. I guess either a bow saw or reciprocating saw would work for smaller trees (8" at the max), but it'd be easy to bind the saw if you weren't careful about how the tree is leaning/will fall. A second person might be useful using those tools to help push the tree away from the cut.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Looks like im getting a corded one. thanks for the replies. What is the "correct" way to cut tree branches and or cut down small trees?
It's a lot easier to look up a picture online so you can see where you should make the cuts, and in which order.

When you cut a branch you should start a bit away from the tree trunk and
1: make a cut from the bottom of the branch about 1/2 way up. Don't try to keep cutting if the saw binds.
2: make a second cut from the top, a little further from the trunk than cut #1. The branch will break and fall.
3: cut the stub off the trunk.

The reason you should do it this way is first, it's easier and safer. Second, it will prevent bark from being torn off the trunk when the branch breaks. The tree needs the bark on its trunk to stay alive. If you do a lot of damage to a tree's trunk it will die.

Here is a really good video to watch of how to cut down a tree. The reason I suggest this one specifically is, it's a knowledgeable guy cutting the tree very carefully, and it still falls down before he expected it to!
http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-T...-Garden-Tools/how-to-cut-down-a-tree/View-All

If you notice, he is just getting ready to put a wedge into the tree and finish it off, when it starts falling by itself.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top