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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m finishing my basement and purchased a set of these LED recessed lights. It says for use in new construction. After opening the box I started thinking about how I would do the electrical rough in.

The install instructions have you install after drywall is up. I guess I would run my wire and leave it long?

Also, The junction box that comes with the kit, is tiny! 2.5”x2”x1.25” or 6.25 cubic inches. That’s not enough space to satisfy box fill allowances, correct?

Has anyone installed these and how did you do the rough in?

I like the idea of these budget friendly lights, but am wondering if I should go a different route.

 

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when you put up your drywall you cut the hole for your light,

leave your electrical feed hanging out of the hole you cut about a foot or two,

when the time comes to install your light, you connect your electrical feed to the grey junction box for the light,

once connected you stuff the box up into the hole, then push the light up into place
 

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Have you installed the drywall yet? if not you can run your wires to the fixture location poke a hole in the drywall and bring the cables out, then install the fixtures when you are ready to, as for the junction box size there are connectors in the box for you to connect to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the responses. I have not installed the drywall. I would like bring power to and from the light utilizing both knockouts. Going to be a very tight fit! At a minimum I think I’m at 5 allowances. 4 conductors and 1 ground. Do you count the wires already installed? The instructions do no specify amount of wire and wire size.
 

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The instructions are specifically telling you to use FMC, MC or a wire whip, and that usually means "from a junction box above it" where the daisy chain connections would be made. However such a box would not be accessible unless you had a drop ceiling.

Doesn't Code require 6” past the end of the sheath? Anyway wire length is rarely the space issue, it's splices.
 

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You cannot fit that much conductor from one cable, let alone the two to 3 cables that some allow.
 
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We make our lighting runs generally in a circle so there are no more than two cables in one box. Place the cables and fasten them to your joist, or leave a couple of feet of sack at each proposed light location. Once the sheetrock is in place, grid your fixtures and drill a 6" or 4" (depending on the size of light) in the appropriate place. Reach up into the hole an feel for your cables, pulling them out of the hole to make your connection. Poking a hole for the wires negates your ability to drill nice clean holes using a pilot bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The instructions are specifically telling you to use FMC, MC or a wire whip, and that usually means "from a junction box above it" where the daisy chain connections would be made. However such a box would not be accessible unless you had a drop ceiling.
This makes sense but I looked over the instructions again and I can’t find drop ceiling, FMC, MC or wire whip anywhere.

If a customer asked an electrician to pull a permit and install these in their Kitchen or living room with drywall ceilings, how would they do it and pass an inspection?
 

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The instructions are specifically telling you to use FMC, MC or a wire whip, and that usually means "from a junction box above it" where the daisy chain connections would be made. However such a box would not be accessible unless you had a drop ceiling.

Doesn't Code require 6” past the end of the sheath? Anyway wire length is rarely the space issue, it's splices.
I don't think the instructions were written by anyone with electrical knowledge. The instructions call the incoming wiring method Pipe. Just from a marketing standpoint it would make no sense to limit the product sold to the mass market to a wiring method not commonly used. It also wouldn't make sense to have to create a junction a foot away from another junction. These instructions are similar to other wafers that make no mention of a limit to a specific wiring method. I vote crap instructions.
 

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Do your layout. Wire the cables into the junction box. Secure the junction box to the framing allowing enough lead for the wafer to be installed. Install drywall. Cut the holes and install the wafers.
 
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Do your layout. Wire the cables into the junction box. Secure the junction box to the framing allowing enough lead for the wafer to be installed. Install drywall. Cut the holes and install the wafers.
I would not secure the box to framing,

If you need to get at that box again, you won't be able to,

Leave the box loose like i said, If you need to access the box in the future, you can pull it out of the ceiling through the hole
 
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