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· Electrician
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Yes, it is permissible to install receptacles in the attic.

They will have to follow the arc fault protection rules from section 26. It basically says that they need to be arc fault protected, including the wiring from wherever your source of power is.
@CodeMatters

Sent from my new phone. Autocorrect may have changed stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, it is permissible to install receptacles in the attic.

They will have to follow the arc fault protection rules from section 26. It basically says that they need to be arc fault protected, including the wiring from wherever your source of power is.
@CodeMatters

Sent from my new phone. Autocorrect may have changed stuff.
Thanks for getting back to me. Are there any specific rules on where I can mount the outlet box(s) (how high off the insulation, etc.)
 

· Very Stable Genius
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Thanks for getting back to me. Are there any specific rules on where I can mount the outlet box(s) (how high off the insulation, etc.)

No, but you'll probably want to use what are known as 1110 boxes
with matching metal covers. 1110's are the type often used on
surface, they're a solid box with rounded corners....if that helps...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No, but you'll probably want to use what are known as 1110 boxes
with matching metal covers. 1110's are the type often used on
surface, they're a solid box with rounded corners....if that helps...
Yes im familiar with them. I worked for an electrician almost a year ago so im familiar with the box types but I just don't recall ever having to install a receptacle in an attic. I thought I recalled something about a junction box having to be mounted somewhere with at least 3 feet of clearance from the roof.
 

· Electrician
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Yes im familiar with them. I worked for an electrician almost a year ago so im familiar with the box types but I just don't recall ever having to install a receptacle in an attic. I thought I recalled something about a junction box having to be mounted somewhere with at least 3 feet of clearance from the roof.
The rule you are thinking of is for the wire.

Any wiring that is installed where there is less than 1 meter of height does not need to be installed "protected".

In better terms, under 1 meter (such as that on a sloped roof) you can run the wires on top of the rafters. Outside that area, you'll need to add blocks or run the wiring up high where you can't step on It.

CodeMatters may be able to explain it better than me.

Sent from my new phone. Autocorrect may have changed stuff.
 

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Two other options is to run low voltage wiring to each camera or to return them and buy the wired Ethernet type where the power is supplied by the Ethernet cable using a PPPoE router. This allows you to connect the cameras through the router to the internet for remote viewing when you are not at home.
 

· Electrician
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Two other options is to run low voltage wiring to each camera or to return them and buy the wired Ethernet type where the power is supplied by the Ethernet cable using a PPPoE router. This allows you to connect the cameras through the router to the internet for remote viewing when you are not at home.
OP may have purchased something like the Ring cameras. I've install receptacles for them before. Running low voltage for them would be hard, as they were 5 volts, so the voltage drop would be huge.

Sent from my new phone. Autocorrect may have changed stuff.
 

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OP may have purchased something like the Ring cameras. I've install receptacles for them before. Running low voltage for them would be hard, as they were 5 volts, so the voltage drop would be huge.
Not at all. Voltage *drop* isn't a function of voltage. It's a function of current. You have to look up the actual current, as used by the appliance and crunch the numbers.

For instance the Ring battery cameras draw a trivial amount of current and you could carry the necessary power hundreds of feet on simple #14 wire.

Even if they pulled 500ma that's only 5% drop for 100' on #14.

The Ring wired cameras draw a significant amount but they appear to be direct hardwired; they don't appear to give you a chance to feed them with anything but 120V.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hi everyone. Thanks for your responses. I got a good deal on a wifi security camera system but they need a power source which is why I have to run receptacles in the attic. Would I be able to mount the receptacles on the rafters or should I mount them on the top or sides of the joists?
 
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