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Hello all,

I am redoing the kitchen and one of tasks is to retile/tile new areas of the kitchen. I say re-tile & tile, as currently only immediately above the countertop are there any tiles (tiled area about 1 foot in height). The rest is orange peel textured drywall. As part of the remodel I want the tiles to go from the counter top to the ceiling. I'll probably choose smaller, rectangular tiles, say 5 x 2".

I've now pulled out all the countertop & cabinets and have just pulled off/chiseled the tiles. I then painstakenly scraped off the remaining quickset. Unfortunately, parts of the drywall are now showing brown paper (see images below). Further, there are a couple of small holes in the drywall. Whoops.

Can I patch the holes with mud (maybe sand them down), and be OK to tile. Or as there are spots with brown paper, do I need to replace the drywall :( ?

Can I tile onto the orangepeel textured drywall. I don't think being super smooth is a requirement, right, as the quick set can form orange the texture?



 

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Drywall is cheap--cut out that bad board and replace with clean material--
If it will be tiled--the seams only need tape and one coat of topping--no need to finish it---
 

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I would check the soundness of that wall as well as check for any signs of moisture. Questions to ask yourself:

Does the wall feel "loose" or moist?
Is the wall dry, smooth, and clean?
Will the paper on top of the plaster sheetrock support the weight of the tile?

If the wall isn't suitable to hold the weight of the tile (a lot of this depends on the type and size and amount of tiling you wish to do) you will need to replace with a suitable backing board.

You can use drywall but I always say to do it 100% and not 50% now which ends up being 150% later.

I always recommend "backer board" when tiling, It's not terribly expensive and is very strong. Replace the planned area to be tiled with this, tape and putty the seams, then apply your tile and caulk when done. Paint the edges if any to match surrounding walls, and you're done!

Also, a side note, if you don't have a GFCI receptacle in the line of outlets in your kitchen you may want to swap that outlet pictured to a new GFCI outlet to bring it up to code. These receptacles trip at the device itself to protect the circuit from water splashes in bathrooms, outdoors, and in kitchens.

Cheers
 
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