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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all -

I had a question regarding the best steps and in what order to take when repainting a deck.

I recently moved over into a house and inherited a large deck that has previously been painted (or solid stained) and is now in need of a serious update.

Here is what I am thinking I will do and would appreciate any advice on if I am missing anything and if the order I am planning on doing this seems right.

1. Power wash deck
2. Replace Boards
3. Sand deck
4. Paintable wood preservative
5. Prime
6. Paint

I think the thing I am debating most is the power wash and sanding steps and if I should flip those.

Thanks all!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you, I appreciate the advice.
Any reason you prefer the solid stain over paint? I have read that paint will last a very long time.

Also, a few follow up questions.

1. Could I power wash, sand and apply the wood preservative this fall, and then wait until the spring to apply the top coat?

2. If I end up going with paint–how long can i go between primer and paint? Its unlikely that I would be able to do it all in a weekend, and would need to spread it out over a few weeks, is that okay?

Thanks fo your help!
 

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Got a picture you can post of this deck?
You need to forget about any form of "wood preserver" if your going to paint or stain.
Soild stain will fade, and not need priming, paint will peel and take far longer next time to prep.
If I was to use a solid stain, it would be Olympic Max.
Depending on where you are and the weather, and new wood used can take a bare min. of a month to dry out before doing anything.
 

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Any reason you prefer the solid stain over paint? I have read that paint will last a very long time.

Solid stain doesn't require a primer and there is less prep needed when it comes time to recoat.


No need for a wood preservative - that's part of the deck stain's job.


how long can i go between primer and paint?

Most manufactures state that the primer must be top coated within 30 days, you can fudge a little.
 

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I've become the "Debbie Downer" here on DIY when it comes to decks. Like a lot of pro painters on here, I've been at it a long time. Trust me when I say that there isn't a product on the market that will give you anymore than 2 or 3 years of service before needing re-done. It's just the nature of the beast, the beast being a horizontal wood surface that takes an absolute beating from the elements and foot traffic from people and pets alike. Nothing holds up to that kind of abuse. If you can afford it, consider the TREX type decking made of recycled plastic. I used it on a small deck of mine and, after 12 years, it looks almost brand new and I've done NOTHING to it.

I mean, do the best prep you can. Buy the best stain you can afford. Just don't expect any miracles and plan on doing it all again in 2 or 3 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone. This is all very helpful.
I would LOVE to do Trex, but it would cost a fortune.

As requested, I am posting a few pictures of the deck. This should hopefully give a sense of the size of this deck–also take note of all the built in benches and stairs (all made from 2x4's turned sideways), and the footings on all of them.

Through this thread I am slowly being convinced to go the route of solid stain. My main concern, and reason I was leaning towards paint, is that I am afraid it is going to be almost impossible to get this entire deck perfectly down to bare wood.

Thanks!
 

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Naildriver
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I'm not a painter, and don't play one on TV, but from experience all I can say is don't use Behr Deck Over. It is a curse that will live with you for many years and is irreparable. I agree with the solid stain, but you have a ways to go to get to the wood on your deck.
 
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One thing working in your favor is that your deck looks like it's in a rather shaded area. Although this lends itself to producing mold/mildew on your deck, it is the UV rays from the sun and harsh weather that destroy a deck coating. The reason some of us are recommending a solid stain over paint is that it will soak into the wood fibers a bit more than the paint which basically is just gonna lay on the surface. That is a nice deck and worthy of being well-taken care of.
 

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Thanks everyone. This is all very helpful.
I would LOVE to do Trex, but it would cost a fortune.

As requested, I am posting a few pictures of the deck. This should hopefully give a sense of the size of this deck–also take note of all the built in benches and stairs (all made from 2x4's turned sideways), and the footings on all of them.

Through this thread I am slowly being convinced to go the route of solid stain. My main concern, and reason I was leaning towards paint, is that I am afraid it is going to be almost impossible to get this entire deck perfectly down to bare wood.

Thanks!

That deck is fine, just needs a good cleaning. BM restore + brighten. If it still beads water anywhere use remove instead of restore. Apply with a garden pump sprayer then agitate with a stiff brush. Power wash to rinse. let dry 48+ hours. You can use a transparent or semitransparent stain.
Not sure of square footage but I would wager around 5 gallons of stain + 2 for railings.


 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Great, thanks guys!
@Gymschu – I agree, I love the deck, it just needs a little TLC, I was so busy doing other things around the house since we moved in, its been pretty hectic.

So – here is what I am gathering.
1.replace some of the boards that damaged.
2.Then clean the deck with some sort of mildew cleaner/brightener. (Either mixed in the power washer, or scrub then power wash.)
3. Sand the best I can
4. Solid Stain.

And I guess I just want to confirm based on all of your experiences that if I sand it down but there are still some areas where the original finish isn't removed, I should still be okay with the solid stain and not seeing anything show through the new coat?
 

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Great, thanks guys!
@Gymschu – I agree, I love the deck, it just needs a little TLC, I was so busy doing other things around the house since we moved in, its been pretty hectic.

So – here is what I am gathering.
1.replace some of the boards that damaged.
2.Then clean the deck with some sort of mildew cleaner/brightener. (Either mixed in the power washer, or scrub then power wash.)
3. Sand the best I can
4. Solid Stain.

And I guess I just want to confirm based on all of your experiences that if I sand it down but there are still some areas where the original finish isn't removed, I should still be okay with the solid stain and not seeing anything show through the new coat?

BM Remove + Brighten you can skip most sanding. Best application is with power washer soap dispenser or garden pump sprayer. Then agitate with a stiff brush/broom.



Should get the wood down to where you can use a transparent or semi transparent stain.


If you want to use solid stain, same procedure as above. Prime with BM094 then solid stain.
 

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@cocomonkeynuts The Remove and Brighten are two products that need to be applied separately, correct?

Yes first remove, then brighten to neutralize the sodium hydroixide. applied while everything is still wet. Use a power washer to rinse, I usually use a 40 degree tip on my yamaha 4040. Let the chemicals do the work... but be careful not to get any on exiting paint/stain you don't want to be stripped.


This is preferred to just sanding because it also removes dirt, grease, salts... where just sanding alone will not.




https://youtube.com/watch?v=c5GuC4HGWIM
 
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