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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a double oven range that requires 40amp breakers (stated in the manual).

The inspector was checking everything and noted that when both ovens are on 350 temperature and all the burners are on, the breaker trips.

Now my contractor checked the wiring with a voltage tester and said everything was working as recommended and didn’t know why it tripped the breaker when everything was on.

Part of me wants to let this slide since I’ll never be running everything on high…but this was listed as an “essential” item to fix or get looked at in the report.

Any ideas why this is happening and if it needs to be repaired?

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If I'm reading that tag correctly, at 240 volts, your stove is rated at 16kW ( 16,000 watts)

16,000 watts divided by 240 volts = 66.6 amps.

There is either a typo in the label, or something else is going on.

Doing a google search, the best info I could find is that its a 2500w convection oven, with a couple of 2000 watt top burners, a 3000 watt "fast boil" burner, and a 1200 watt burner.

2500+2000+3000+1200+2500 = 11,200 Watts = (11.2kW)
11,200 divided by 240 = 46.6 amps, and that 46.6 amps assumes your grid power is at 240 volts. Lately, our grid power has been going up to 248 volts (124 volts per leg) here in my area, and when it comes to resistance heaters, that would cause your burners to suck up even more juice.

I think that they assume you will never run everything at Warp 9.
 

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Update:
Found your exact model number and your burners are even larger than what I listed. Your entire stove is in fact, rated at 14.4kW and WILL trip a 40 amp breaker if you go full bore with it.

Man, the electric bill alone would give me nightmares.
 

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Njuneer
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Sounds like more data needs to be collected. There is going to be a data plate somewhere visible on that unit. Open door, find it, etc. But be advised, High, low, med, matters none! They only have two modes....on, and off. That means if you put it on low when warming both ovens, it will draw the exact same current. Something seems up here unless someone installed a BA oven and didn't upgrade the electrical to handle it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Update:
Found your exact model number and your burners are even larger than what I listed. Your entire stove is in fact, rated at 14.4kW and WILL trip a 40 amp breaker if you go full bore with it.

Man, the electric bill alone would give me nightmares.
So should it be updated to 50amps? I would never run everything at once, but I thought it was weird that the breaker was tripping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sounds like more data needs to be collected. There is going to be a data plate somewhere visible on that unit. Open door, find it, etc. But be advised, High, low, med, matters none! They only have two modes....on, and off. That means if you put it on low when warming both ovens, it will draw the exact same current. Something seems up here unless someone installed a BA oven and didn't upgrade the electrical to handle it.
I see two 40amp breakers.

Here’s the exact range…

 

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Njuneer
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I mean, I am not there with the unit. Seems like you getting an AC clamp meter would help you a lot because I would probably try different functions and see how much things pull. I am not going to go through the manual but that page does indicate 2650W for top and bottom ovens, and a 40A breaker. However, it also lists an insane amount of other elements. I have no idea what all it does. Does it dispense TP? I would think it would be designed not allow too many elements on and trip breakers, but...... It shows IR cooking as well. Get enough elements on at the same time and you bet she will blow!

Maybe read the manual first. It might have all the answers.
 

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I see two 40amp breakers.

Here’s the exact range…

You have one single 40 amp double-pole breaker. Its double pole, so it takes up two single pole spots.

Single pole breakers are for 120 volt items, double pole breakers are used for 240 volt items.

Your stove is fine, its just not designed to run at Warp 9.975. Just use it like a normal person and you'll be fine.

The company probably knows that very few homes have anything larger than 40 amp circuits to electric stove hookups, and at the same time, they want to impress you with the power of their stove. Since common sense use would almost never have anyone turning everything on and at full power all at the same time, they figured it would be good enough, and it probably is, until some unique person decides to test the appliance and see how much energy it can release.

When you bought your car, you didn't try going as fast as the highest number on the speedometer did you? (just the thought of that makes me chuckle)
 

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Before deviating from what the manufacturer specified as far as the breaker size, I would check the wire size.

Did the electrician install the correct wire size?

The wire should be #8 copper or #6 aluminum based on the 40 amp rating of the breaker.

If you increase the breaker size, you may need to increase the wire size, neither of which I see a need to do.

As other's have stated, the chances of every element being on at the same time are pretty low.
 

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The manufacturer is "out to lunch" on the required circuit size. It says 16 KW which I believe, but that is 66 amps. No wonder it trips at max. Of course it probably has a 50 amp cap on the cord, or is it direct wired?
 

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The NEC allows a 16kw range to be calculated at 40 amps since generally the oven will cycle on and off and many range elements will also. This is the demand factor. Now the code allows it but in this case a 50 amp breaker may have been a better choice.

The oddity of the NEC allows a 9kw range up to a 16kw range to be wired with a 40 amp circuit
 

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Red Seal Electrician
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A range is a composite, non-continuous load (thermostatic). Normal residential use should not cause nuisance tripping.

Fwiw, In Canada, the same range in a non-residential setting requires the circuit to be sized directly per the kW rating.
 

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This is all true about continuous vs total calculated load. I suppose the NEC allowed a 40 amp circuit, but that may be a bit stretching what you may need during the holidays. If you don't trip the 40 amp during normal use, you're fine and safe because the breaker is properly protecting the wire. If you do determine that you have #6 copper wire, do change the breaker to 50 amps.
 

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A range is a composite, non-continuous load (thermostatic). Normal residential use should not cause nuisance tripping.

Fwiw, In Canada, the same range in a non-residential setting requires the circuit to be sized directly per the kW rating.
Same here. I assumed we were talking residential but commercial ranges would not have a demand factor so 16 kw divide by the voltage
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So, should I have this looked at by an electrician? I don’t plan to ever use the stove this way, but I also want to address any potential issues.

Thanks!
 

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Red Seal Electrician
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The installation sounds safe from what you describe. The issue seems to be the inspector running the appliance beyond normal residential use.

Are you in Canada or the US?

Also, If your feed is #8, and happens to be rated for 45A, there are breakers that size too.
 

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According to the 2020 NEC your 16kW range actually is rated at 9.6kW when looking at Table 220.55 Demand Factor.
The range is over 12 kW so in column C the Maximum demand is 8kW then because of note 1. you add 5% for each 1kW over the 12kW column (4x5=20%) 20% of 8kW is 8x1.2 9.6kW.
9600/240V = 40AMPS.
Your range over-current protection is fine just don't turn on every damn thing at once.

Andy.
 

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To me, it seems like the code and the manufacturer consider it similar to the main breaker for your house. If every electrical thing in the house was turned on at the same time, of course it would trip the main breaker, but since that pretty much never happens in a residential setting, the main breaker doesn't have to be sized for it. Plus, it's a nuisance, but it's not a safety issue.
 
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