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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new to this forum so bare with me.
There are several posts on converting a 3 prong outlet to a 4 prong outlet to meet the more up to date codes. Regrettably, my house id from the 80's and the builders were cheap you-know-whats and the 10/3 wire they ran to my dryer did not have a bare ground.

Here is my question; If I pull a bare ground from an adjacent outlet and use it for the ground post in the dryer outlet what would be the disadvantage of the idea?

To my thought process this would give me the proper 2 hot, 1 neutral and a ground that I need. The circuit would still be completed and the ground would still run to the box.

I appreciate any input... Thank you in advance.
 

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If you are not moving the dryer, then the installation is compliant the way it is.
Nothing needs to be changed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a new dryer that uses the ground peg (4 prong) and the existing outlet is 3 prong. I prefer not to switch the cord on the dryer mainly because I like the more reliable grounding from a 4 prong outlet.
 

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I have a new dryer that uses the ground peg (4 prong) and the existing outlet is 3 prong. I prefer not to switch the cord on the dryer mainly because I like the more reliable grounding from a 4 prong outlet.
Then you are going to have to pull a new cable from the panel to get your ground wire you need.
You just can't pick a ground from any circuit.
 

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Hard to believe wiring from the 80's doesn't have a ground. Was this NM or SE cable?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It looks like NM since I do not see a bare ground wire, just the 3 insulated wires. Black, White, and Red all wrapped in black.
 

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Licensed Electrician
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I'll bet there is a ground in there and it was simply cut off.
 

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I'll bet there is a ground in there and it was simply cut off.
Nope, they made 10/3 without ground back then to comply with having an insulated neutral/ground for dryers.
 

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Nope, they made 10/3 without ground back then to comply with having an insulated neutral/ground for dryers.
They must not have used it much around here...never seen it.
 

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Nor have I.
 

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I have only seen it in a few houses around here, and they were all dryer circuits.
 

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I have seen this type of wire, and yes, it was popular in the early 1980s.

You can run an external grounding conductor, but it has to go back to the panel, or tie into your grounding electrode system. It is not permissible to connect it to an adjacent circuit's ground wire. [see NEC 250.130(C)]

But if you are going to all that trouble, you could simply replace the 10/3 with a 10/3g cable.

But you should be aware that the Code does allow for 3-conductor outlets for dryers, with grounding thru the neutral conductor in existing installations. All you have to do is re-install the bonding jumper in your appliance, and use a 3-wire cord in your existing receptacle.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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I have only seen it in a few houses around here, and they were all dryer circuits.
My electric range receptacle is 3 wire 8/3 NM (BK-RD-WH) without a ground. House was built in 1988-89. I don't use it as I installed a gas range and installed a 120 volt receptacle next to it..
 

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I run into this type of cable a lot, in 14 or 12 ga for 3-way circuits, and in 10 or 8ga for dryer or range circuits.

To the OP: As long as the existing cable originates from the service panel, you can do as KB stated and reconnect the bonding jumper and use a three wire cord.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have seen this type of wire, and yes, it was popular in the early 1980s.

You can run an external grounding conductor, but it has to go back to the panel, or tie into your grounding electrode system. It is not permissible to connect it to an adjacent circuit's ground wire. [see NEC 250.130(C)]

But if you are going to all that trouble, you could simply replace the 10/3 with a 10/3g cable.

But you should be aware that the Code does allow for 3-conductor outlets for dryers, with grounding thru the neutral conductor in existing installations. All you have to do is re-install the bonding jumper in your appliance, and use a 3-wire cord in your existing receptacle.
I think that will be the simplest solution. I hate to not have it set up right, but I don't hate it enough to have to rewire it. The cable runs from downstairs to the attic and back down to the panel. Life would be so much easier if the lowest common denominator was not the highest so many attempt to achieve.
 
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