DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

· Wire Chewer
Joined
·
3,600 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been quite adventurous now that I own a house. Been reading up a lot on proper electrical codes and what not. Had to run a wire for my dishwasher so I decided to use #12 to support 20 amps and ran from the kitchen to the panel which went well as below the kitchen is an unfinished crawlspace.

Opened up the panel once I got to it, shut off the main breaker, removed an old circuit that I don't need (it feeds the washroom and closet which will be removed) and added my wire in. The breaker is a 20 amp conveniently. Once I was done I also ran the dryer plug which was just a short wire as the dryer will go where the panel is now. Both worked flawlessly first try. (which is a good thing, don't want any mistakes with 240 volts :p)

Went fairly smooth, though it took me a while to get the old wire out as it is tight in there. Fairly well organized panel though, just small and full.
 

· Learning by Doing
Joined
·
3,165 Posts
Clap Clap Clap. Now, you just have to get your permit and you will get a gold star! :thumbup:

Seriously, good job. I know that first foray into the breaker box is nerve racking. But, get your permit and you will be so proud of yourself. It will entitle you to another completely self aggrandizing post about your massive awesomeness. And you will TOTALLY have earned it.
 

· Registered User
Joined
·
6,521 Posts
Now, you just have to get your permit and you will get a gold star!
Just another reason to like you Leah! :yes:

Good job Red Squirrel. :thumbsup: Just remember...Just because the receptacles work and the lights come on doesn't mean that it was necessarily done correctly! Always a good thing to have your work double-checked by someone qualified.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
425 Posts
I'm been working up the nerve to go into the box. I need to add a circuit for the media room that I'm adding but I'm leaving the circuit breaker to the last minute. Glad to hear someone found it easy enough, that gives me hope I wont kill myself. :huh:
 

· Wire Chewer
Joined
·
3,600 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Haha yeah I turned my face away when I flipped the main back on, "just in case". I always pull a bit on my wires to ensure they are tight and double check my work before turning anything on though so I was confident all was good.

About getting a permit, is this something you'd do after taking a full blown electrical course to have an electrical career or is this something anybody can do?

I actually have a nice setup for my panel as it used to be fuses, and they left over the main cut off switch, so I can cut power to the box completly. The idea of having the box semi electrified even by shutting the main breaker makes me a little scared but knowing there was zero power in there reassured me more. The bus bar looks fairly hard to touch by accident though. A pre breaker short is not something I would want to see up close. :eek:
 

· Learning by Doing
Joined
·
3,165 Posts
So, I can't vouch for our neighbors to the north, eh? But in my township any homeowner can pull a permit for electrical work (so long as the home is their primary residence and they have resided there fore nine months). In my town a permit for something like you did would run in the $45 dollar range.

Laws on this vary greatly. Call your city building office and ask them. It's the only way to find out for sure.

PS. even after running 10 new circuits and going through the permitting process I still turn my head when I turn the main back on. :laughing:
 

· Banned
Joined
·
5,990 Posts
No drama new work short tester

With heavy clip leads, wire a 10A, 120v hair dryer across the turned-off CB that feeds your new work, for 1 or 2 seconds.

If the voltage across the dryer reads more than 72v out of 120v this is more than a 120v, 15A load.
More than 80v, more than a 120v, 20A load.
Wear level 2 arc flash protection for this one. If the voltage across the dryer reads more than 114v this is more than a 120v, 200A load.
 

· Electrician
Joined
·
1,404 Posts
No drama new work short tester

With heavy clip leads, wire a 10A, 120v hair dryer across the turned-off CB that feeds your new work, for 1 or 2 seconds.

If the voltage across the dryer reads more than 72v out of 120v this is more than a 120v, 15A load.
More than 80v, more than a 120v, 20A load.
Wear level 2 arc flash protection for this one. If the voltage across the dryer reads more than 114v this is more than a 120v, 200A load.
Okay what are you talking about, i have never heard of this before. Your voltage will never change, if you have 100ma or 15A on your circuit your potentioal will still be 120V. Voltage is like water pressure, it shouldn't fluculate the more amperage you use. Yes there is situations where your voltage will drop but under normal properly wired situations your voltage is constant.

You should always look away and only have your hand over the panel when you flip the breaker(called the left hand rule). If there is a short chances are your breaker will trip right away and not blow up in your face but there is a chance of this happening though.
 

· Banned
Joined
·
2,487 Posts
Okay what are you talking about, i have never heard of this before. Your voltage will never change, if you have 100ma or 15A on your circuit your potentioal will still be 120V. Voltage is like water pressure, it shouldn't fluculate the more amperage you use. Yes there is situations where your voltage will drop but under normal properly wired situations your voltage is constant.
He's referring to wiring the hairdryer in series with the circuit, then measuring the voltage at the hairdryer connection. There will be a voltage drop across the dryer that is different than the circuit voltage. What this will help with, is if there is a short in the circuit, you won't blow the breaker. The measurements at the terminals will tell you the condition of the circuit.

If you read 120 V, then there is a short. If you read less than 120 V, there is not a short.
 

· Banned
Joined
·
5,990 Posts
Okay what are you talking about, i have never heard of this before.
That's 'cause it's original, sort of. :)
It's a more refined version of putting a 100w incand. lamp across an open breaker to check new work for shorts. The problem with incand. lamps is that the filament resistance depends on the current through it.
I carry a 100W, 100Ω rheostat that I got at a Hamfest to do these kinds of checks.

Series circuit consisting of 120v source, hair dryer, unknown load.

120/10A = 12Ω hair dryer ohms

120v/15A = 8Ω. load resistance for 15A
120 [8/(8+12)] = 48v across the load.
120-48 = 72v across the dryer. More than 72v is more than a 15A load.

Similarly for a 120v/20A = 6 Ω load (80v across the dryer) and for a 120/200 = 0.6 Ω load (114v across the dryer).

If the hair dryer fan actually runs at these low voltages you can leave it in the circuit for more than one or two seconds.
 

· Wire Chewer
Joined
·
3,600 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Wow way to complicated for me, i will stick with turning the breaker on and seeing if it pops.
That's my current method too lol. Though normally I'm 99% confident everything is ok. If I'm doing something more complicated I will find myself going back and forth often during the work to turn it on/off while testing wires that are not yet connected. I also often put two wires together (with no power) then test voltage at another end to see if it reads close to 0 then test for closed circuit using the feature on my multimeter, then I know where those two wires go. I found myself tracing stuff this way for a few hours when I found some weird setup in a junction box. Turns out the circuit that powers the lights in my crawlspace also powers the fridge. :laughing:
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top