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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there, I have a heat pump and is currently only a pad that is partially buried. While I've cleaned around it and in it... and I have come to the determination that the unit needs to be raised 3-4 inches as dirt is accumulating. My concern is breaking the fluid line if I were to raise it too much for abruptly. If possible I would like to just raise it a few inches and slide a new pad under it. In a perfect world I would move it to the side, lay a concrete pad, and move it back. Although I think the lines would break.
Thoughts on the best option?
Do I just need to pay someone to break the lines, lay the pad, and come back to connect them?
 

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An engine hoist. Not that it's that heavy but an engine hoist will lift smoothly, slowly, and pretty close to straight up. It'll also hold it in the air all day if need be so you will have lots of time to level the pad out.
 

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If you move (elevate, wiggle, etc.) your heat pump it IS quite possible the liquid and/or suction lines will break where they are brazed, just as you questioned. It's also highly likely that a HVAC specialist would charge a pretty penny to recover refrigerant, disconnect, reconnect and perform all the necessary associated steps that would be necessary in order for you to elevate your unit. If I were in your shoes I would a) verify (by consulting a trustworthy specialist) that the determination is accurate and the unit truly needs to be elevated and b) I would also contact someone to provide a quote for performing the required steps that would allow me to elevate the unit. My budget would determine the order in which I proceed with those two steps. Bear in mind, if you gamble and elevate your unit without disconnecting it first you will lose your refrigerant if either line does "break," and it will become even more costly because at that point you will also need to pay for new refrigerant. Best Regards.
 

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I raised my 3 ton condenser about 6 years ago when I built a ground floor deck. It really wasn't that heavy. IIRC I single handedly lifted one side at a time from the ground up to the joists. Raised it over a foot and had no issues with the lines. You might or might not have issues depending on how much slack the lines in your install have. If alls you are going to do is put it on a concrete pad I think you'll be fine.
 

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Cooper becomes harder and more brittle with work hardening. (Weaker and more playable with significant heat)

If the installation is recent, and the lines are longer then a couple of feet, you'll be able to do it without damage. Care and patience is the game there. I personally don't recommend it, but I've seen it done many times.

If the installation is several years, (or decades) old, it's highly unlikely you'll be able move it more then about a inch per couple ft of piping without it cracking somewhere. Again, I've seen it done, but in this case, it usually ends up with me on a service call to repair it. Extreme patience and smoothness of definitely the game here.

FYI: A bit of dust inside or around the outdoor unit isn't terrible. Pets do far more damage then the dirt will. I've had to add 2 patio stones when replacing units like that, just to get them above the ground. The previous unit's lasted decades.

Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Thanks all! I got a few 18 inch pavers I placed under there until spring comes around. That's the next service date and I can do a better job when my service man is out here. I had about 5 ft of line and I hope I didn't move it too much.
 
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