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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We're new owners of a 1966 original condition home in Southern CA in a fairly upscale, mature neighborhood (this may be relevant, read on). It's not a tear down, but a full remodel of all rooms & 2 bathrooms. The ceiling in the 2nd level hallway is only 6 '10" high! (22 ft long) I'm a short lady and I can reach the ceiling. :sad: The roof pitch is parallel to the hallway, so I'm told there is space. HVAC has flexible ducting, so it is not a big issue.

Has anyone been involved in raising ceilings? Not asking for a ballpark here (hence the post about asking for estimates)... but I'm asking if the number $30k sounds reasonable to those who have done it before? This does NOT include any HVAC movement which is being handled separately. Given that my contractor's quote for other work seems fair, this is way more than I expected. . Side note: We have the option to relocate the furnace to the attic to add space on that narrow section of the hallway as well. Thanks for your input!
 

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retired framer
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We would have to know how and why it was built that low, usually something like that has a good reason.

It could be as easy as pulling down some box down structure or as involved as restructuring the roof and who know what.
 

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Can you provide more information about your house?
What type of roof construction do you have (trusses, rafters)?
Why your hallway ceiling height is just 6’-10”???

Is it because you have HVAC ductwork soffit above?

What is the ceiling height in the bedroom (adjacent bathroom)?

Can you post the pictures of your attic above the hallway?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Looked like rafters....I got a pic from the inspection, but I can't seem to find how to upload it. HVAC was not included as we are handling that ourselves separately, and as mentioned, most of the ducting was previously converted to flex ducts. Oh, and ceiling height in bedrooms: All 8 foot ceilings.
 

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Hammered Thumb
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You really can't give a good guess based on that sketch. The roof appears complicated with the back wall jutting in and out, or you have some kneewalls in a 1.5 story. If the ceiling is part of the roof framing, then that could be more complicated. Add to it the surcharge for your neighborhood and maybe seismic engineering and it will be higher than just buying some wood and drywall.
 

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If you want to keep that possible furnace move open, you need to have your architect/engineer plan the access for it now.

Otherwise, something they do now may block or otherwise prevent the future frame out of a large enough hole for the equipment and the required attic access ladder.

Edit: since you think most of the quote is fair, my guess is the raise the ceiling $30k probably is as well. That would mean he sees a lot more work to it than you are seeing. Ask him about it.
 
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