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Help! I need advice on how to proceed. We are having a complete roof replacement. Monday they tore off the old roof and laid down new OSB and felt. Monday night it rained. No tarps wrote down, as the rain was a surprise. I have discovered an inch or two of water in my porch light (which now no longer works ) and what I think are drip marks/ dark water spots on what I think is called a soffit...to me, the ceiling over the front porch. The weather has since been warm and dry.

Now what ? What is the best way to dry this out, if necessary ? The contractor did not seem worried about the possible wetness, since the felt was down, but I worry about mold in the possibly wet insulation.

Any advice welcome, and thanks !
 

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it always scary when you do a tear off. im in arizona, little rain and no warning, and im nervous every time. but i do make sure that it's dried in every time. we use at least #30 felt and button cap's to hold the felt down. plus we never roof up and leave the section not run to the top, in case it rains it cant get under the shingles from above. you can alwasy dry a sloped roof in, even sealing around the pipes with the flashing, which you'll have to pull up when roofing it, or sealing the pipes with henery's. theres always that = who's at fault if a freak rain happens, but the roofer has to take some type of steps in case. in less it was a freak storm that started as soon as they removed the roof and there was nothing they could do, well then id be doing some big time complaining. if i can dry a roof in after being torn off in the morning on a 110 degree day in July, major humid, then i would think any one could. again it goes back to who's fault is it. does it really matter. better not to have that question have to be asked.
 

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Don't WANNA do it myself
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We JUST had this happen - over the entire back of our house. Ruined three ceilings and six walls.

It needs to be opened up and dried out. Obviously water got through, because there's water in your fixture. All of your joists are wet, and there is little to no air circulation to get them to dry. You need an electrician in to assess the wiring to the fixture. The OSB itself is probably fine, but the joists under the OSB will likely be wet. The felt needs to come up, and at least one OSB panel needs to come up so that you can view the joists. And don't let the contractor tell you that they looked and it's fine. YOU should look, or have a third party look at it. And have a third party look at the electric as well.

We're in the middle of a fight to get the repairs done, it's been two weeks and the roofer is still arguing about what was and was not damaged. We've been trying to be fair, but it's looking like we're going to be contacting the insurance company and have them deal with it. We collected over four GALLONS of water from one light fixture... and she thinks that it's no big deal....
 

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Metal Roofing
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Make sure the underlayment is checked and any bad areas are redone...papering is roofing 101. Just because its summer time doesn't mean you should do a lousy job papering.
 

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Roofmaster
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This is the difference between a professional roofer and a hack. A professional roofer closes up behind himself, and only bites off what he can close up that day. He never removes an entire roof, or even an entire slope without the forces necessary to dry in the area quickly. Here in MD where I live, rain can come out of nowhere, due to the location of the mountains and the Chesapeake Bay.

Rain damage that is attributable to an unprotected dwelling is the roofing contractors fault, period. Moisture intrusion into walls and ceilings results in wet insulation and mold. Questionable conditions should be checked with a capacitance meter, a conductance meter, a boroscope, and possibly an infrared camera in some cases. A professional roof and building envelope consultant should be called in as a third party in such an event.

Guessing is as foolish as hiring a hack based on price.
 

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We JUST had this happen - over the entire back of our house. Ruined three ceilings and six walls.

It needs to be opened up and dried out. Obviously water got through, because there's water in your fixture. All of your joists are wet, and there is little to no air circulation to get them to dry. You need an electrician in to assess the wiring to the fixture. The OSB itself is probably fine, but the joists under the OSB will likely be wet. The felt needs to come up, and at least one OSB panel needs to come up so that you can view the joists. And don't let the contractor tell you that they looked and it's fine. YOU should look, or have a third party look at it. And have a third party look at the electric as well.

We're in the middle of a fight to get the repairs done, it's been two weeks and the roofer is still arguing about what was and was not damaged. We've been trying to be fair, but it's looking like we're going to be contacting the insurance company and have them deal with it. We collected over four GALLONS of water from one light fixture... and she thinks that it's no big deal....
She thinks it's no big deal? Where are you located? This reminds me of a company I had the misfortune to work for once.:jester:
 

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Don't WANNA do it myself
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I'm near Rochester, NY.

Yup, no big deal... her contractor wants to skim coat the damaged walls and ceilings, and doesn't even thing that the wiring in the light fixtures even needs to be looked at.
 

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Roofmaster
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I'm near Rochester, NY.

Yup, no big deal... her contractor wants to skim coat the damaged walls and ceilings, and doesn't even thing that the wiring in the light fixtures even needs to be looked at.
Romex has a paper wrap around the ground. This can cause a fire. Insulation in the walls absorbs water, as does drywall. This lady is not the sharpest sword in the scabbard.
 

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Don't WANNA do it myself
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No insulation in my walls. But 140 year old studs and lathe, which I'm sure has absorbed plenty of water but because the attic was thoroughly air sealed a few years ago I see no easy way for it all to dry out.

All the insulation is (was) in the attic.
 

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Roofmaster
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No insulation in my walls. But 140 year old studs and lathe, which I'm sure has absorbed plenty of water but because the attic was thoroughly air sealed a few years ago I see no easy way for it all to dry out.

All the insulation is (was) in the attic.
Well this might be a very different kettle of fish. (No Pun Intended) Are you saying that your home is Balloon construction, and plaster on lath? What kind of wiring do you have? You have insulation only in the attic floor? What Type? Post some pictures if unknown.
 

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Don't WANNA do it myself
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We have a brick home with plaster and lathe walls. No insulation in exterior walls. Attic has (had) 14 inches of blown in cellulose, with foam to air seal all rim joists and wall openings. All wiring in the attic/second floor is 12 or 14 / 2 romex.

Some interior walls have vermiculite insulation that migrated down from the attic when that was originally installed, but it's not in all walls and not all of the stud bays are full. Some random spots in the exterior walls also have vermiculite but it's not at all consistent.
 

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Roofmaster
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We have a brick home with plaster and lathe walls. No insulation in exterior walls. Attic has (had) 14 inches of blown in cellulose, with foam to air seal all rim joists and wall openings. All wiring in the attic/second floor is 12 or 14 / 2 romex.

Some interior walls have vermiculite insulation that migrated down from the attic when that was originally installed, but it's not in all walls and not all of the stud bays are full. Some random spots in the exterior walls also have vermiculite but it's not at all consistent.
Well, plaster and lath is surely working in your favor as it is way more resistant to moisture than drywall. I suspect you have balloon construction, which originally allowed air to pass from the basement, through the walls and out into the attic. My first home was built like this and I had cellulose blown in between the studs. The bottom and top was stuffed with fiberglass. It sounds to me like you have a significant amount of water sitting on top of your ceiling below the roof, and I would test it with a delmhorst moisture probe. This device will tell the story. You can also use a Tramex Leak Seeker which is a capacitance meter. I have posted images of these for you. The cellulose in your attic may have to come out and be replaced. The roofer should pay for this. If there is only the one electrical line to the fixture, I would replace that too. If I was you, I would not have any exposed foam. This stuff puts off a poisonous gas when it burns. It should never be left exposed to flame.
 

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Don't WANNA do it myself
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Roofer is paying for everything - or at least their insurance is.

Every speck of cellulose has to be removed from the back half of the attic. It was all wet, and according to the manufacturer, it must all be replaced. A lot of it has already been taken out, but the remaining is still wet after two weeks.

Yes, I believe it's balloon framing. There are fire breaks in the interior walls, but not in the exterior walls. Insulating exterior walls in an old brick home is not a good idea.
 

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Roofmaster
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Roofer is paying for everything - or at least their insurance is.

Every speck of cellulose has to be removed from the back half of the attic. It was all wet, and according to the manufacturer, it must all be replaced. A lot of it has already been taken out, but the remaining is still wet after two weeks.

Yes, I believe it's balloon framing. There are fire breaks in the interior walls, but not in the exterior walls. Insulating exterior walls in an old brick home is not a good idea.
I agree to some degree. I do not know why insulating exterior walls would not be a good idea though. If you look at the attached diagram, you will see that if you remove the baffles at the sill plate, and remove it in the attic, you will have free air flow through the walls. If you put a couple of good fans in the attic windows (Assuming you have them) you can draw air from the basement up through the exterior walls, except where the windows are of course. Yes Cellulose is Paper. It has to come out. I would recommend something like rock wool or fiberglass when you re-insulate for fire resistance. I have also heard good things about ceramic beads for the walls. Good luck with this, and do not get too worked up. This too will pass. :thumbsup:
 

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Don't WANNA do it myself
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You don't insulate the exterior walls in an old brick home because the bricks need some heat to help prevent ice damage to the bricks and the mortar. Once you insulate the exterior walls, old bricks tend to start popping apart in the winter as freeze/thaw cycles happen. Then the only solution is to paint or otherwise seal them. I spoke to a few historic building preservation people about this and all of them said the same thing. Modern brick is one thing, 140 year old brick is a different issue.

Cellulose insulation is treated so that it's not just a giant attic tinderbox. We'll be putting cellulose back in once the wet stuff is removed and everything is repaired and/or replaced.

Our house has dividing boards between the floors, it's not just open stud bays from basement to attic. I believe those are called fire breaks? So that a fire in the basement or on the first floor couldn't just shoot up inside the walls and end up catching the roof and attic on fire. From what I understand, true balloon framed houses that catch fire often end up a total loss because of the air passages from top to bottom of the house in the walls.
 

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Roofmaster
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You don't insulate the exterior walls in an old brick home because the bricks need some heat to help prevent ice damage to the bricks and the mortar. Once you insulate the exterior walls, old bricks tend to start popping apart in the winter as freeze/thaw cycles happen. Then the only solution is to paint or otherwise seal them. I spoke to a few historic building preservation people about this and all of them said the same thing. Modern brick is one thing, 140 year old brick is a different issue.

Cellulose insulation is treated so that it's not just a giant attic tinderbox. We'll be putting cellulose back in once the wet stuff is removed and everything is repaired and/or replaced.

Our house has dividing boards between the floors, it's not just open stud bays from basement to attic. I believe those are called fire breaks? So that a fire in the basement or on the first floor couldn't just shoot up inside the walls and end up catching the roof and attic on fire. From what I understand, true balloon framed houses that catch fire often end up a total loss because of the air passages from top to bottom of the house in the walls.
You might want to check to see what the treatment is. I think it used to be Boric Acid, which leaches out over time. Im going to check with the Brick Institute in VA and see what their take is on old brick. Very interesting, thanks.
 

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Don't WANNA do it myself
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The fire retardant is listed as "borates" which is probably boric acid, as you said. The insulation warranty says it doesn't lose fire resistance over time.
 

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Roofmaster
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The fire retardant is listed as "borates" which is probably boric acid, as you said. The insulation warranty says it doesn't lose fire resistance over time.
Its Paper, Paper is Organic. Things eat Organic things. Paper Absorbs Moisture. It sounds like you have no vapor retarders in your walls, so in the cold months, water vapor is constantly impregnating any insulation you have. If your drying cycle exceeds your wetting cycle, fine. If it does not, I would use an anti-hydrogenous product. There are better, more FR alternatives, but it is your house, I was just offering suggestions, thats all.

Good Luck with your home
 
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