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Quickrete Core Fill Grout (can't find it local)

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I will need about 24 bags of grout fill for my job. Googling says that Quickrete Core Fill Grout is the right stuff to use but none of the stores around me sell it. I found I could order it from White Cap online but the shipping cost is almost as much as the materials.

Is there an alternative product that could be used effectively that I might find in North East Florida stores? The few grouts I see specifically say they are not meant for this purpose.
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I will need about 24 bags of grout fill for my job. Googling says that Quickrete Core Fill Grout is the right stuff to use but none of the stores around me sell it. I found I could order it from White Cap online but the shipping cost is almost as much as the materials.

Is there an alternative product that could be used effectively that I might find in North East Florida stores? The few grouts I see specifically say they are not meant for this purpose.

From the MCMA :

All you need to know... recipes.. and data
Concrete Masonry grout.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Maybe if you tell us what you are trying to do we can help you better.

Pictures always help.
I am trying to purchase materials for grout filling cores in a CMU wall that does not exist yet so no pictures.
It is stem wall for a room on a crawl space only 3 blocks high...filling cores with the vertical rebar and the bond beam around the top.
Sorry, I got hassled at work over something while starting that post and got distracted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Why can’t you use bags of sakrete with small aggregate? Might have to rod the mix to get it to flow into all the cells, so fill 2 courses at a time and leave it about half way up so the next fill keys in properly.
I don't know...that is kinda what I am asking. When googling it seems "grout fill" is supposed to be a certain type of grout. Certainly if I am allowed to use something else that is what I am after. Only thing I can gather is that grout fill is designed to be soupier and small aggregate.
Also, I can't do any fill until inspector looks at finished block wall with rebar in place.
 

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I don't know...that is kinda what I am asking. When googling it seems "grout fill" is supposed to be a certain type of grout. Certainly if I am allowed to use something else that is what I am after. Only thing I can gather is that grout fill is designed to be soupier and small aggregate.
Also, I can't do any fill until inspector looks at finished block wall with rebar in place.
I think "grout fill" is more of a term for the process and not the material.

You could always call your phone inspector and ask if you need a special mix.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think "grout fill" is more of a term for the process and not the material.

You could always call your phone inspector and ask if you need a special mix.
Yeah I will ask him. I try not to ask the guy who is inspecting my work too many questions that might make him think I don't have any idea what I am doing lol.
If regular Sakrete is good to go I will use that...but yes there apparently is specially designed grout fill and I thought I was required to use it lol...

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The note says that is for when the grout space is smaller than 4” in either direction. If you are using common cmu you don’t have that condition.
Yes, true, it is available in course as well.
I am only filling a single core straight down 3 blocks deep (actually 2 since the top row is bond beam) so I don't think the aggregate will be an issue no matter what I use. I just didn't want to use concrete if it specifically requires a "grout". If it is just a matter of using a material that is fluid enough to fill with no voids damn near anything should work in my case.
 

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Yes, true, it is available in course as well.
I am only filling a single core straight down 3 blocks deep (actually 2 since the top row is bond beam) so I don't think the aggregate will be an issue no matter what I use. I just didn't want to use concrete if it specifically requires a "grout". If it is just a matter of using a material that is fluid enough to fill with no voids damn near anything should work in my case.

Have you given thought to using the applicable building code?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Have you given thought to using the applicable building code?
Wow. No, that had not occurred to me at all.

Forgive me if this comes off as rude but I work in the civil design field. When we create a set of plans for a client to build a subdivision WE as the designers have to go look at all the relevant codes in the jurisdiction to be reviewing the plans and incorporate those into the design with notations and details describing exactly how to build everything in a way to meet those codes. I am very familiar with the codes related to my field. The contractor who receives the plans and is tasked with building the project should not (and likely never does) have to go find a code for anything. They would typically either already KNOW the way most of these typical things are built because they have done hundreds of them already or can easily find the detail of anything custom or unusual in the plans. Final option would be to call up the E.O.R. and ask them what they intended.

In my case, I am the contractor, I have plans created by an Architect that couldn't give two shits about my crappy little addition, charged me way more than he should have, took three times longer than he should have and has been all but unresponsive to my emails since the time I paid his fees. He outsourced the structural design to someone who he refused to allow me to contact directly, who is likely in his mid 20's and who seemed to have created his entire set of drawings with cut and paste generic notes and details (half of which do not even pertain to my project). Getting any answers from these people is all but impossible and I gave up even trying.

I could spend hours trying to locate and decipher all of the applicable building codes related to my questions and hope that I do not miss or misinterpret something (which is definitely a possibility, happens all the time in my work when reviewers read something differently than you do) or I could come to a forum full of professionals, contractors or experienced DIY'ers and tap into what they already KNOW. I don't need to go look up the code for all the technical specifications or requirements on a 2X4 or a sheet of plywood because that stuff is already done. It is clearly noted in the plans if I didn't already know from experience what I needed to buy.

Unfortunately, I have no experience with code requirements for masonry projects, I do not have a subscription that it seems I need to view some of the technical information like ASTM C476 and the following detail is literally the only guidance I got from the plans.

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It does not even tell me if it needs to be solid fill for the whole wall or just the reinforced cores. I am going to err on the side of overkill and just fill the whole wall since it is so short.
All that said, I DID in fact attempt to find what I need to know in the local residential version of our BC and have posted some snippets below. I just was hopeful that a forum designed for people to discuss and trade knowledge about construction subjects might have some consensus on what is typically used for this task.

Right now, I am leaning towards either 3000psi sakrete or Type S mortar.


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Codes vary but when I built my son's addition we only filled the cores that had rebar or J hooks.
Like MARK notes above as to codes varying and applications varying, in SoCal (earthquake building), on a cmu retaining wall about 4' high (which had full footers and plenty of bar) we just filled it with what we call a 2" mix ( which is just 4000psi with small aggregate that can be pumped thru a small "2" hose). We were not under permit, but that was the customary procedure in the area.

For what its worth....I really have not done much with cmu.
 
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