DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

Questions on framing partition walls

537 15
Hi,

I'm finishing a basement and adding walls according to an existing floor plan (labeled as wall a and b on the floor plan). These are non-weight bearing walls. I have a few questions on how to frame them.

Each of the two large walls (Wall A and Wall B) images have a door towards the end. If walls need to anchored to the floor within 6" of the end of each bottom plate, I don't know how to anchor the side past the door. Especially on Wall Bb, there is a large closet opening, and then a doorway, and there doesn't seem to be anywhere I could possibly anchor it to the floor. In image Wall B 2, I removed some of the king studs to make room for a two or three gang switch box. I could anchor it to the floor there? But that would be the only anchor to the floor. There woudl be anchors to the ceiling and other existing walls. Does that work?

Also, in image Wall B 2, where I removed the studs to put in a box, does the blocking work there to replace the missing studs?

Attachments

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

· retired framer
Joined
·
70,177 Posts
Hi,

I'm finishing a basement and adding walls according to an existing floor plan (labeled as wall a and b on the floor plan). These are non-weight bearing walls. I have a few questions on how to frame them.

Each of the two large walls (Wall A and Wall B) images have a door towards the end. If walls need to anchored to the floor within 6" of the end of each bottom plate, I don't know how to anchor the side past the door. Especially on Wall Bb, there is a large closet opening, and then a doorway, and there doesn't seem to be anywhere I could possibly anchor it to the floor. In image Wall B 2, I removed some of the king studs to make room for a two or three gang switch box. I could anchor it to the floor there? But that would be the only anchor to the floor. There woudl be anchors to the ceiling and other existing walls. Does that work?

Also, in image Wall B 2, where I removed the studs to put in a box, does the blocking work there to replace the missing studs?
A few things
Anchor is not needed with non bearing walls. You can shoot them down, pin them down with nails or use screws.
Non bearing walls do not need headers just a top sill and cripple studs.
Are the exterior walls built inside the foundation yet?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A few things
Anchor is not needed with non bearing walls. You can shoot them down, pin them down with nails or use screws.
Non bearing walls do not need headers just a top sill and cripple studs.
Are the exterior walls built inside the foundation yet?
What do you mean by "shoot them down, pin them down with nails or use screws"? Do you mean into the concrete? Or do you mean nail/screw them into existing walls/ceiling?

The exterior walls are built. I am just adding partition walls to frame off bedrooms.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That will work, but they aren't necessary unless you plan to have a vertical joint in your drywall there.
What do you mean by vertical joint in the drywall? I think I know, but want to make sure I understand. After looking at the wall again, I drew the diagram wrong. There is an existing soffit box that runs over part of the door in that wall. I am not 100% how to frame around that.
 

· retired framer
Joined
·
70,177 Posts
What do you mean by "shoot them down, pin them down with nails or use screws"? Do you mean into the concrete? Or do you mean nail/screw them into existing walls/ceiling?

The exterior walls are built. I am just adding partition walls to frame off bedrooms.
Concrete
Anchoring with bolts is only needed for bearing walls.
Pinning is drilling a 3/16 hole, inserting a wire or trimmer string and nail it down.
Screwing is drilling a hole and using a tap con screw
Shooting is done with a hammer activated nail gun
Product Bullet Gun accessory Auto part Gas
Jeans Leg Plant Asphalt Waist
 

· Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Concrete
Anchoring with bolts is only needed for bearing walls.
Pinning is drilling a 3/16 hole, inserting a wire or trimmer string and nail it down.
Screwing is drilling a hole and using a tap con screw
Shooting is done with a hammer activated nail gun
View attachment 722505 View attachment 722506


When you say non-bearing walls do not need to be anchored, you mean it doesn't need to be anchored with a bolt? But it still needs to be pinned/have a tap con screw, or nailed? If an attachment to the concrete floor is required, I am assuming the rule to anchor within 6" of the end of a bottom plate is required?

If so, then I guess I am stuck with my original question. Where do I put these attachments in the bottom plate of the walls?
 

· retired framer
Joined
·
70,177 Posts
6" from the end is a rule for anchors and bearing wall, so the bolt does not interfere with the studs, a non bearing wall on concrete is treated more **** a wall on a wood floor.
We stick frame walls on concrete so we nail the plate down first and nails will not interfere with the studs.
Your wall would look like this if i built it, the bottom plate gets cut for door ways after the wall is built.
Rectangle Parallel Symmetry Font Electric blue


Rectangle Parallel Font Symmetry Pattern
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,357 Posts
What do you mean by vertical joint in the drywall?
Where two sheets of drywall join. Since it's not a bearing wall, you want to be sure of is that the vertical joint where two sheets of drywall meet there is something to fasten the drywall to. If you are using 1/2" drywall, you just need a stud every 24" on center. I stick to 16" o.c., but if a stud needs to be offset a bit for some reason, it's not a big deal.
 

· retired framer
Joined
·
70,177 Posts
Where two sheets of drywall join. Since it's not a bearing wall, you want to be sure of is that the vertical joint where two sheets of drywall meet there is something to fasten the drywall to. If you are using 1/2" drywall, you just need a stud every 24" on center. I stick to 16" o.c., but if a stud needs to be offset a bit for some reason, it's not a big deal.
You always start your lay out 3/4" short or 1/2 stud so 4ft or 8ft and all increments of 16" or 24" lands in the center of the stud.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
6" from the end is a rule for anchors and bearing wall, so the bolt does not interfere with the studs, a non bearing wall on concrete is treated more **** a wall on a wood floor.
We stick frame walls on concrete so we nail the plate down first and nails will not interfere with the studs.
Your wall would look like this if i built it, the bottom plate gets cut for door ways after the wall is built.
View attachment 722515

View attachment 722516
Ok, thank you for the explanation. Also, thank you for taking the time to make diagrams. Let me make sure I understand.

I am will not be able to frame the wall on the floor and tip it up into place. I will need to place and secure the bottom and top plates, then toenail in the studs? I will secure the bottom plate with a nail under each stud (a total of 8 nails in the diagram above). Is that right?

You would recommend pinning the bottom plate down with nails? I am not familiar with this method for securing wood to concrete. Could you also use a tap con screws with a flat head? Are there advantages to the nailing method?

With the nailing method, you drill a 3/16 pilot hole through the wood and into the concrete with a masonry bit? How far into the concrete do you drill? And what type of nails are used? You just use standard lawn trimmer line? What does the nylon thread do?

Sorry for so many questions. I appreciate your help!
 

· retired framer
Joined
·
70,177 Posts
Ok, thank you for the explanation. Also, thank you for taking the time to make diagrams. Let me make sure I understand.

I am will not be able to frame the wall on the floor and tip it up into place. I will need to place and secure the bottom and top plates, then toenail in the studs? I will secure the bottom plate with a nail under each stud (a total of 8 nails in the diagram above). Is that right?

You would recommend pinning the bottom plate down with nails? I am not familiar with this method for securing wood to concrete. Could you also use a tap con screws with a flat head? Are there advantages to the nailing method?

With the nailing method, you drill a 3/16 pilot hole through the wood and into the concrete with a masonry bit? How far into the concrete do you drill? And what type of nails are used? You just use standard lawn trimmer line? What does the nylon thread do?

Sorry for so many questions. I appreciate your help!
No amount of questions are to many.
The wire or nylon string just makes the nail that little bit tighter in the hole.
We just use a rotary hammer drill and drill right thru the wood into the concrete with a 4" long bit and that is deep enough for a 3" common framing nail even if there is dust in the bottom of the hole.
If you are using treated for the bottom plate the nails should be hot dipped galvanized.
I am not sure about the screws (I have not used them enough)
We always put something between wood and concrete, tar paper, sheet poly, or sill gasket, even for treated wood.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
No amount of questions are to many.
The wire or nylon string just makes the nail that little bit tighter in the hole.
We just use a rotary hammer drill and drill right thru the wood into the concrete with a 4" long bit and that is deep enough for a 3" common framing nail even if there is dust in the bottom of the hole.
If you are using treated for the bottom plate the nails should be hot dipped galvanized.
I am not sure about the screws (I have not used them enough)
We always put something between wood and concrete, tar paper, sheet poly, or sill gasket, even for treated wood.
I really appreciate it. I will have more questions coming up. Thank you for the help!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
No amount of questions are to many.
The wire or nylon string just makes the nail that little bit tighter in the hole.
We just use a rotary hammer drill and drill right thru the wood into the concrete with a 4" long bit and that is deep enough for a 3" common framing nail even if there is dust in the bottom of the hole.
If you are using treated for the bottom plate the nails should be hot dipped galvanized.
I am not sure about the screws (I have not used them enough)
We always put something between wood and concrete, tar paper, sheet poly, or sill gasket, even for treated wood.
There is a soffit box partially above the door. Is this how you would frame around it?

For these non-weight bearing walls, are screws a problem instead of nails for framing?

I noticed that several existing walls of my basement have a double sole plates (treated and then non-treated on top). Is there any advantage of this?

Thanks for all of your help!
 

Attachments

· retired framer
Joined
·
70,177 Posts
Yes that is how I would frame that door.
Some places need Treated lumber on the bottom for local code. We only need something like sheet poly or sill gasket between concrete and regular wood. Not sure about the extra plates but it might have been needed to make a certain size stud work.
How tall are the studs in those walls?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The ceiling is only 8 feet
Yes that is how I would frame that door.
Some places need Treated lumber on the bottom for local code. We only need something like sheet poly or sill gasket between concrete and regular wood. Not sure about the extra plates but it might have been needed to make a certain size stud work.
How tall are the studs in those walls?
The ceiling is not quite 8 ft. A large part of the walls with double sole plates have air vents over them. The studs under the air vents are only about 80". I don't think the others are even 90".
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top