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I’m not sure if I’m posting in the wrong forum, so I apologize in advance. My question is actually about a tile backsplash (not a floor), but I’m hoping someone can help. I am installing glass subway tile (3x6). This is my first tile project, so I’m a bit nervous. I’m planning to start on one of the smaller areas. I’ve watched a lot of YouTube videos, but I still have a lot of questions. The tile I’m using doesn’t have a pencil trim or bullnose. I was just going to leave an exposed edge since it’s polished and seems to look okay. My concern is that I don’t know if it should go right to the edge of the wall or if I need to leave 1/16” or so for silicone.

There is also an outside corner, and I’m not sure if this is manageable without some type of bullnose or schluter strip. Could anyone give me some suggestions for this?

I ran a laser line, and I see that the counter is slightly higher as I move to the right. Is it okay to slightly cut the bottom tiles so that I establish a level base for the rest of the install?

I appreciate any help!
 

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Naildriver
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12,112 Posts
Glass tile will be tough, even for experienced tilers. Mitering is an option, but alternating overlap will look good, and you may get better results. Stock up on glass tile blades. They will dull quickly. Once the tile starts to burn, either slow down or change blades.
 

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Remodel and New Build GC
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If this is your first glass tile job..............(I saw a botched job on a house we were considering that you may want to be aware of.)

Depending on the exact tile....they are somewhat transparent or tranlucent.

Therefore, they somewhat can show the substrate behind them and you want a consistant look.

The job I saw, did not have a uniform substrate coloration, and where the adhesive or thin set (don't know which) had been unevenly raked, it created sort of a blotchy uneven appearance.

Good luck
 

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Naildriver
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One other thing. The backing will burn, so use your tike saw fence and cut half way through the tile from the back, flip it and cut the remaining half. I polish the edge with a ROS and 220 grit.
 

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If this is your first glass tile job..............(I saw a botched job on a house we were considering that you may want to be aware of.)

Depending on the exact tile....they are somewhat transparent or tranlucent.

Therefore, they somewhat can show the substrate behind them and you want a consistant look.

The job I saw, did not have a uniform substrate coloration, and where the adhesive or thin set (don't know which) had been unevenly raked, it created sort of a blotchy uneven appearance.

Good luck
Building on what Peter said, consider using the grout color you are planning on using between the tiles as the bonding agent instead of thinset.

I think you may want to use sanded instead of non-sanded, and mix it a bit stiffer, and you want to leave it flat instead of raking it out.

I believe I saw it on This Old House.

But, it makes a lot of sense to do it that way. Or instead of using the same grout color, you could use a contrasting color. Just give it a little wiggle as you set it and give it a lot longer dry time as glass won't absorb the moisture as it dries.
 
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