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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just bought a 4K 82" Samsung. It's being shipped right now. I'm hearing horror stories on the upgraded content protection features (HDCP) built into the newer hdmi setups. I play a lot of movies (ripped from bluray) stored on a central hard drive system for the house. I have 4 tv's in the house and it's much easier keeping all this stuff all on single central hard drive system.

The movies I have on the drive are all 1080p and not 4K, so I shouldn't have content protection issues..... or will I?
 

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I have a 4k RCA. I haven't had any issues with Roku or Firestick although those units aren't 4k.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ahhh... sigh of relief!
Thank you.
I have been ripping bluray to the hard drive for years.... 20 terabytes in total thus far.
 

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Most 1080p and even some 720p and 1080i content has HDCP copy protection. When played on a non-HDCP TV set the picture is actually shown as 540p or other reduced resolution similar to 540p.

Over the air HDTV is either 1080i or 720p and usually unprotected.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Most 1080p and even some 720p and 1080i content has HDCP copy protection. When played on a non-HDCP TV set the picture is actually shown as 540p or other reduced resolution similar to 540p.

Over the air HDTV is either 1080i or 720p and usually unprotected.
Well, I have 1080p now and all my movies are (maximum) 1080p and I stream from central nas to various media streamer boxes around the house (mede8er, and wdtv live boxes) and have no issues getting full resolution and full surround sound (although the living room set up is the only one which can take advantage of the actual surround sound tracks through an 11 channel Denon AVR).

Word has it though that they have increased the grade of HDCP protection at the 4k level..... which I don't really care about. I'm fine with 1080p. It's not the 4k ability I bought the tv for anyway... just wanted a bigger screen. As long as it all continues to work at the 1080p level, that's all I care.
 

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Challenge Everything!
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Here is how the Videos are displayed on my very own 82 Inch Samsung TV:

Any Blu-Ray I have, is being ripped on to my Synology NAS as an .ISO File. Those NAS are behind my detached Garage in a Shed.
In my Home theater, I fire up either the Dune or the Zidoo Network player. They will pick up the .ISO from the NAS, sending it to my Marantz AV7704.
From there, it goes directly to the Samsung TV. Uncompressed Ultra HD Blu-Rays (each 75-93 GB, btw) are playing in all their Glory, with Menus and all, in 4K.

From the Garage to the House I got a 175 Ft. 100 gigabit Fiber Cable running, but it did work well over Cat6.
Enjoy your TV and report back here please.😎

Edit:
If you send all of your Devices to a Receiver like me (DirecTV, XBox, 4K Blu-Ray player, Roku, etc) then make sure the receiver is passing a 4K Signal.
Also a good Idea to buy some newer 4K certified HDMI Cables.
Cheers,
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Edit:
If you send all of your Devices to a Receiver like me (DirecTV, XBox, 4K Blu-Ray player, Roku, etc) then make sure the receiver is passing a 4K Signal.
Also a good Idea to buy some newer 4K certified HDMI Cables.
Cheers,
Yeah. My Denon avr is good for 4k. That's not an issue. It worries me a little though. I had my Denon set for automatic updates and some have complained that their ripped movies have stopped working because of the updated 4k HDCP protection. It's the newest version 2.2 HDCP support
 

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I have an old receiver without HDMI, but it only gets used for sound, not switching. TV is connected via optical cable to the receiver, so it doesn't really matter what the source is—if it would come out of the TV, it comes out through the receiver.
 

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@Bob Sanders , with due Respect, when you rip the Movies, all HDCP protection is removed.
I use AnyDVD HD for this purpose.
And @huesmann, with the optical connection you miss out on all the new Sound formats, such as Dolby Atmos, DTSHD, DD+, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I have an old receiver without HDMI, but it only gets used for sound, not switching. TV is connected via optical cable to the receiver, so it doesn't really matter what the source is—if it would come out of the TV, it comes out through the receiver.
Yeah... I invested a fair bit of money into the audio end of my system specifically to get the higher end audio... which kind of gets cut out with optical. You really need the hdmi to take advantage of the higher quality audio.
 

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I hope you will enjoy it as much as I do.
I'm also looking for an 8K now, some are already available.
Long story, 🤪
 

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The way I understand it (and I could be wrong), the HDCP is not based on the content, but about the device the video signal is being sent to. Newer bluray players send out a 'query' asking the device it's connected to the equivalent of 'are you a display device?' If it receives a signal back that says 'yes I am.' then it sends the video (and audio). Otherwise, all you get is the HDCP error message. It's supposed to keep the player from sending the data to a recording device. Of course it's easily bypassed (see below), but I guess it makes movie distribution companies feel better.

I had an issue with my bluray player I wanted to connect to an older projector with no HDMI. A $10 HDMI splitter solved the problem. The splitter (like most available) has an "HDCP defeat" built in, which basically means the splitter sends the signal back to the player that it's a TV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The way I understand it (and I could be wrong), the HDCP is not based on the content, but about the device the video signal is being sent to. Newer bluray players send out a 'query' asking the device it's connected to the equivalent of 'are you a display device?' If it receives a signal back that says 'yes I am.' then it sends the video (and audio). Otherwise, all you get is the HDCP error message. It's supposed to keep the player from sending the data to a recording device. Of course it's easily bypassed (see below), but I guess it makes movie distribution companies feel better.

I had an issue with my bluray player I wanted to connect to an older projector with no HDMI. A $10 HDMI splitter solved the problem. The splitter (like most available) has an "HDCP defeat" built in, which basically means the splitter sends the signal back to the player that it's a TV.
That's the way I understood. HDCP is a hardware based protection system, and not so much a software system like copy protection on a disc, and it's further complicated by the fact that HDCP 2.2 is not backwards compatible to HDCP 2.1 so the end result is a bunch of handshake issues between machines. Most North American hardware is also no longer coming out with component rca inputs/outputs either because they can not be HDCP protected in the way that hdmi can.

A lot of Denon owners have had to do that splitter trick because these machines just aren't cooperating with each other any more unless everything is perfect. But I think it has to do mostly with the new HDCP2.2 being mixed with older non 2.2 stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I hope you will enjoy it as much as I do.
I'm also looking for an 8K now, some are already available.
Long story, 🤪
I used to live on the cutting edge of technology, but not any more. It's too expensive and it just changes too fast now. It's a mere ploy just to get you to spend money. When BluRay and HDdvd were fighting for the crown I bought into HDdvd... one of the first models out. When 3d tv came out I bought a 3d tv (the 60 inch I'm presently replacing is a Sony Bravia 3d).

Now that i'm getting a 4k, I may play around with some 4k video for the heck of it, but honestly 1080p is just fine for me. It works, and it has a reasonable quality to it. I'm still a member of the AVS forum where technology junky's tend to hang out... but not so active anymore.
 
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