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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello
This inquiry is related to irrigation, which is not the intention of the forum, but my specific question relates to reduction of PVC. And you experts will know better.
I have a well pump that feeds an irrigation valve using 1.5 inch PVC. Leading up to that valve is a sediment filter and a hose spigot.

I need to replace that indexing valve with electronic ones, and those electronic ones appear to be readily available with a 1 inch inlet; ones do exist with 1.5 inch inlets but they cost double or more. The tubing out to the sprinkler heads is also 1.5 inch PVC.

So my options are:
1. Build a 1.5 inch manifold and remain with 1.5 pvc all along and spend the extra money for the 2 valves - the easiest route.

2. Stay with 1.5 out of the pump, through sediment filter, reduce to 1 inch for the valves, expand back to 1.5 for the outgoing tubes. - the second easiest.

3. Redo everything out of the pump with 1 inch (spigot and new sediment filter) up to the valves. Then increase up to 1.5 after the valves to join the outgoing tubes. - the most expensive

The well pump has 1.5hp (ha) and is used 3 days a week to irrigate 2 zones in a moderately-sized front and back yard. Zone 1 has the rotors, and zone 2 has the sprinkler heads, and they won't be watered at the same time. The runs from the pump to the farthest heads are about 300 feet or so.

Will I lose a lot of pressure or flow or whatever if I choose options 2 or 3? Option 3 involves a bit more spending since I would have to buy new 1 inch tubing and sediment filter and spigot assembly.

Thank you
 

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You are going to loose flow rate reducing to 1 inch. And then pressure expanding back to 1 1/2. Does your system layout require that pressure to distribute evenly? Or in other words, will slower moving water irrigate some portions while leaving others high and dry? In order for a manifold to work properly the entire manifold needs to be pressurized.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You are going to loose flow rate reducing to 1 inch. And then pressure expanding back to 1 1/2. Does your system layout require that pressure to distribute evenly? Or in other words, will slower moving water irrigate some portions while leaving others high and dry? In order for a manifold to work properly the entire manifold needs to be pressurized.
good question Yoda, said Chewbacca.
The person that installed it years ago didn't do a lot of explaining, nor did I bother or think to task some technical details. From the pump to the farthest point is quite a ways, so I will assume that the slower moving water may reach all points, but will it have enough force to lift the spray heads and actually spray the area intended? I think that probably not.
 

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I think you should bite the bullet on the two 1.5'' pumps, and stay with the system that you know works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think you should bite the bullet on the two 1.5'' pumps, and stay with the system that you know works.
thanks Yoda. You are wise.
I will probably take that route.
The red handle on my current ball valve (to switch from irrigating to spigot use) broke off, and I now can't turn it; it sat exposed to rain and sun all along, but in my new set up, it will be protected.

I'm leaning toward getting one of those ball valves that have a thin yellow handle and looks easier to turn. Is there any reason why I shouldn't get that vs a regular white/red pvc ball valve?
 

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Typically yellow handles are reserved for gas lines. I would stick with the red. No sense possibly confusing someone someday. Exercising the valve handle periodically will help to keep them from seizing up over time.
 
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