DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone - I was trying to anchor some pressure treated wood to my basement slab (home built 1965) for the base of a bar. I was planning to use Tapcons & Loctite PL. The other day I put down the wood with the PL and a day later I noticed it hadn't stayed in place. I believe the primary reason is because there is a layer of mastic & carpet glue adhesive on the floor, and the PL bound to the mastic and separated it from the concrete slab (you can see that in the pic). So I pulled up the wood today to scrape off the PL where I could and noticed a lot of moisture on one side and this has me concerned. Could this be from the pressure treated wood ? My slab has been exposed for a long time and I have done moisture tests and have never had an issue with moisture from the slab - The pressure treated wood was wet when I put it down and it's pretty dry now, so I'm not sure if the slab extracted the water from the wood or what ? Anyone have any thoughts? Not sure if this should be in the flooring forum. Thanks in advance.
 

Attachments

·
retired framer
Joined
·
59,597 Posts
The moisture is likely from the wood but even treated wood should not be contact with concrete. sill gasket, sheet plastic between and drill and tapcon screws.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for the reply - I had always been under the impression that treated wood could be in direct contact with concrete. I will look to get some kind of vapor barrier in place. I was really surprised to see the water under the wood - and hoping the wood was the source. Thanks !
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
59,597 Posts
Thank you for the reply - I had always been under the impression that treated wood could be in direct contact with concrete. I will look to get some kind of vapor barrier in place. I was really surprised to see the water under the wood - and hoping the wood was the source. Thanks !
If there is moisture in the concrete it will wick into wood, and having green lumber is good but the wicking is not guaranteed to stop there.
One problem you can have with treaded lumber as a bottom plate is once it is down tight to the floor it will dry the high side first which can encourage cupping. Cupping may return to flat later as it dry's but big pieces like 2x10s on the flat can cause trouble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've always had issues with treated wood warping. In fact the reason this wood did not stay adhered was because it began to bend and that separated the mastic from the concrete. When I purchased the wood, it was straight, but wet. I made certain to use it right away, and placed very heavy material on top but that didn't help. I probably should have screwed it down immediately, but I'm thinking all that moisture would have been trapped under the wood.
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
59,597 Posts
I've always had issues with treated wood warping. In fact the reason this wood did not stay adhered was because it began to bend and that separated the mastic from the concrete. When I purchased the wood, it was straight, but wet. I made certain to use it right away, and placed very heavy material on top but that didn't help. I probably should have screwed it down immediately, but I'm thinking all that moisture would have been trapped under the wood.
No it would wick thru eventually but right away the top dry's faster and shrinks, so the top surface is not as wide as the bottom surface and you get cupping.
Lumber is always stacked with air gaps for more even drying
https://www.google.ca/search?q=old+...Aw&biw=1920&bih=940#imgrc=_&spf=1532753645643
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top