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I'm about to work with a a product that I've never worked with before: PVC! This is totally foreign to me. I've done a bunch of reading with manufacturer's installation recommendations and working properties, however I would really like to hear the scoop from those of you who have worked with various types of PVC trim, door casings, etc.

I have a new roof structure and remodeled end wall that is about to get trimmed out. I have to trim around windows, along the roof line, all the fascia boards, and along the brick veneer. I'm also going to re-case a door that is rotten. It will be trimmed out in the same PVC. I'm considering PVC sheet for soffits, however I may go a different direction, since they don't have the weather exposure that the trim and fascia see and I would really like to T&G the soffits and eaves.

I would love to hear some tips and tricks for working with this stuff. Fastening, filling screw/fastener holes, gluing, caulking, etc. Also, anything you can recommend for installing this in colder weather (above freezing) would be appreciated. I noticed the high coefficient of expansion. I'm sure that will play into the required gaps and whatnot.

Thanks! Looking forward to any input! This is completely foreign to me!

Scott
 

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OH! And on a side note, I did a search and didn't see much, but "PVC" by itself doesn't seem to search well. If there is another thread on this subject, please point me to it!

Thanks guys!!
 

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for cutting, standard wood blades work fine with it just make sure your wearing a dust mask if your diong alot of cuts.

fastening wise, use stainless steel gun nils other wise the nails will rust and bleed
 

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for cutting, standard wood blades work fine with it just make sure your wearing a dust mask if your diong alot of cuts.

fastening wise, use stainless steel gun nils other wise the nails will rust and bleed
Great! How about filling holes and types of suitable caulking?

I noticed there is a screwing system by Cortex that appears to be pretty slick. Appears the bit screws and then trims the hole for a plug. Seems like that could be worth the money. Anyone used these?
 

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cortex screws do work but their time consuming.. for caulking i just use standard white window and door caulking, polybutyl type... some guys use drydex for filling nail holes however im not a fan.. you can also get epoxy putty for filling holes
 

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Just google instructions for installation of azek. You will have all you need. Cortex fasteners are NOT any more labor intensive than trim head screws, more labor than just nailing the stuff, but a better installation overall. Plastic EXPANDS, mostly lengthwise, so if you are putting two eight foot pieces together to reach sixteen, you don't butt the pieces but use a scarf joint.....and then use plastic glue to glue the joint....and then it acts as one sixteen foot piece , joint doesn't show, but you still need to leave room at the ends. Ron
 

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Just google instructions for installation of azek. You will have all you need. Cortex fasteners are NOT any more labor intensive than trim head screws, more labor than just nailing the stuff, but a better installation overall. Plastic EXPANDS, mostly lengthwise, so if you are putting two eight foot pieces together to reach sixteen, you don't butt the pieces but use a scarf joint.....and then use plastic glue to glue the joint....and then it acts as one sixteen foot piece , joint doesn't show, but you still need to leave room at the ends. Ron
Scarf joints are definitely great! I have a length of fascia that will be a solid 18 feet or more, so I'll be doing a joint there for sure. Good tip!

I've googled quite a bit and watched a few videos with mixed approaches. I just figured starting a thread on the topic would make for some good conversation from people do this on a regular basis. Seems to be material that more and more people are starting to work with.
 

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Azek spec sheet calls for round head nails, if you use nails, but finish nails (16 gauge or 15 gauge (better)) are used by lots of folks. I put 1 piece 17 foot corner trim boards on all corners of my house with 15 gauge finish nails years ago and never had a problem. Stainless finish nails....although galvanized will work if you fill them. Bondo is often used to fill countersunk screw holes. For long runs done in more than 1 piece rabbets are often used...that way expansion and contraction will still leave the joint intact and the substrate covered. If you install in very cold weather leave gaps at the ends so there will be room for expansion when the hot weather returns....small bead of caulk to hide the gaps.
There are several brands of PVC on the market but AZEK brand gets high marks for product consistency. As others have said it's very easy to work with....cardbide tipped saw blades. Don't use fine toothed blades as they generate more heat and tend to melt the PVC and gum up the blade.
 

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I can't remember well, but Lowes had 2 brands. One cost more but even as a stock, it was straighter. Then I had to finish with some homedepot stock and it was wavy from the store. Since this is outside, and diy, and I would not want to paint it again if I can help it, I would use hand nails bought from the lumberyard. I'd have to check the brand at the box stores but the lumberyard coating was always better. I used ss screws and was careful enough to leave the head even with the surface.
 

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Looking at the windows that my contractor trimmed out real quick (poorly done! :vs_mad:), I noticed that they used a trim nailer and flushed the heads of the nails instead of countersinking them. This seems wrong, but again, I haven't messed with PVC. Seems like the practice should still be to countersink and fill the nail heads. No?

I can't remember well, but Lowes had 2 brands. One cost more but even as a stock, it was straighter. Then I had to finish with some homedepot stock and it was wavy from the store. Since this is outside, and diy, and I would not want to paint it again if I can help it, I would use hand nails bought from the lumberyard. I'd have to check the brand at the box stores but the lumberyard coating was always better. I used ss screws and was careful enough to leave the head even with the surface.
Checked out the stock at Lowes this weekend. They carry Azek and Royal. Both looked really good (and flat!), prices were similar, and selection was virtually identical. Only real difference I saw was a slight color difference between the two. The Royal had a bit more gray in it, versus the Azek was sort of a warm bright white.

I have a couple pieces of scrap Azek from when the windows were trimmed out and I picked up a box of the Cortex screws to try out and see if I like the result. Figured it was worth a shot, if I didn't have to go back and fill and coat after hanging all the trim.

I'm pretty pumped about the idea that I may never have to do anything with this trim or fascia ever again. One and done. This will leave me time to focus on family and other projects I would rather be doing, later.
 

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I recently installed four new construction windows using cellular PVC trim from a big box store. I installed the trim using stainless steel #6 finish nails, I think they were 2-1/2 inch. Countersunk them about 1/4 inch, filled the gap with white latex caulk. Hard to see the holes, I think the product is great for outdoors. I prefer wood for indoor trim, I used a finger jointed Chilean pine product for interior, takes paint nicely.
 

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I recently installed four new construction windows using cellular PVC trim from a big box store. I installed the trim using stainless steel #6 finish nails, I think they were 2-1/2 inch. Countersunk them about 1/4 inch, filled the gap with white latex caulk. Hard to see the holes, I think the product is great for outdoors. I prefer wood for indoor trim, I used a finger jointed Chilean pine product for interior, takes paint nicely.
I definitely prefer wood for interior trim, as well.

Thanks for sharing!
 

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the biggest difference between brands is what the core of the material is like azec is the most consistent.. some of the alternate brands are very porous similar to what a aero choclate bar is like when makes harder to smooth ripped edges...
 

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Looking at the windows that my contractor trimmed out real quick (poorly done! :vs_mad:), I noticed that they used a trim nailer and flushed the heads of the nails instead of countersinking them. This seems wrong, but again, I haven't messed with PVC. Seems like the practice should still be to countersink and fill the nail heads. No?



Checked out the stock at Lowes this weekend. They carry Azek and Royal. Both looked really good (and flat!), prices were similar, and selection was virtually identical. Only real difference I saw was a slight color difference between the two. The Royal had a bit more gray in it, versus the Azek was sort of a warm bright white.

I have a couple pieces of scrap Azek from when the windows were trimmed out and I picked up a box of the Cortex screws to try out and see if I like the result. Figured it was worth a shot, if I didn't have to go back and fill and coat after hanging all the trim.

I'm pretty pumped about the idea that I may never have to do anything with this trim or fascia ever again. One and done. This will leave me time to focus on family and other projects I would rather be doing, later.
Did he use trim head or finish head nails? If trim head...are they color coordinated? If the nails aren't stainless or galvanized paint them in order to avoid rusting. If finish nails then countersink and fill. If trim head then just paint them if they are flush.
 

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Materials have arrived and I'm ready to rock!

Did he use trim head or finish head nails? If trim head...are they color coordinated? If the nails aren't stainless or galvanized paint them in order to avoid rusting. If finish nails then countersink and fill. If trim head then just paint them if they are flush.
They are finish nails and they are countersunk. Can't tell for sure if they're coated or not.
 
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