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I found a lot that is deemed a flood zone. I attached the paper work for that.

I live in Orlando Florida. Does this mean the property is unsuitable to build on? Or does it mean that I just need to get flood insurance?
 

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I live I Louisiana so it may be different but here as long as you have a mortgage you will be required to buy flood insurance. After the mortgage is paid you do not have to keep it. The flood zones are rated, and insurance is charged accordingky
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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I live I Louisiana so it may be different but here as long as you have a mortgage you will be required to buy flood insurance. After the mortgage is paid you do not have to keep it. The flood zones are rated, and insurance is charged accordingky
Same in South Carolina.
 

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You should talk with your insurance agent and the building dept before you do anything.

The building dept can tell you if you can build, and if there are any special requirements. I know of a couple of flood zones (not all) in my county where you will not get a building permit unless the first floor elevation is above the published flood heights. You end up building on posts or over a garage/carport.

The insurance agent can tell you costs related to the flood insurance and any impacts on your homeowners or auto policies,etc.
 

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Is that letter from 2001? Looks like an old elevation certificate letter
 

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Around here you have to build above the expected 100 year flood zone.
As long as the home is built above that level (most often on pilings) they do not even need to buy floor insurance.
I agree 100% with Oso954's advice.
We had a ton of homes around here have to be lifted after Isibell, FEMA even offered to buy some of them to tear them down so they did not have to keep paying flood claims.
 

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Is it worth all that cost and trouble? How about the ground water? Two may be related. Reason for the zoning? Any stream near? You may end up running 2 sump pumps 24/7. I really had to resist the urge to consider the flood zone houses when I was looking and had money in pocket.
 

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MEASURE ONCE, CUT TWICE
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Up on piers sounds good.
You'll only need to replace your car and garage contents when the big one hits.

I would never build there. It's like buying a lot beside an airport and then complaining about the noise. :surprise:

Sorry, just my opinion. I don't know your situation.
If you can save a whole ton of money, even including the high insurance rates, it may be worth it to you to take the chance.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
No stream, River, or body of water near by. There's homes built all around it and roadways. I'm wondering why this one specific spot is Dean a flood zone, get all the other properties are built out?

It's in somewhat the heart of Orlando, not out in the boonies. It's only four or five miles from where I currently live. Properties here are pretty expensive, especially vacant land. If I want to move out of my traditional Suburban home and live on something acre to 2 Acres, this is one of the very few in my price range.

Also, building up on pylons or similar, is actually a legitimate plan. The goal is to design and do all the fabrication and metal work with a container home. I'm a mechanical designer, welder, and Machinist. I'm going to try and look further into this property find out what is the elevation needed where building would be legal.
 

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I'm also in Zone A and we have higher insurance rates than if it was in a different zone.

What confuses me is the letter says the base flood elevation (BFE) is 91.5 feet. If that is correct, that means your house will have to be built at least 91.5 feet above sea level or face very high premiums on your flood insurance. Where in Florida can you find an elevation at 91.5 feet? My guess is the decimal is in the wrong place.

When you check with the building department, they will tell you what elevation you need to build your house at. The lowest spot of all the permanent structures (except garage floor) will determine what BFE your house is at and your insurance company will use that elevation to rate your policy.

If the floor of your house is at 11' but your AC condenser base is at 9', the insurance company will use 9' to rate your policy.

Where I live the BFE is 9.25 feet. Most new houses here are built at a minimum of 10' above sea level and many go higher than that. The higher you go, the lower your flood insurance premium will be.
 

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You also might want to check and see if you need a wetlands permit to build. It's federal here so I am assuming it's the same for you. That could cost you plenty. Any you will have to build to a certain height if it's in a flood zone. I live in a flood zone. I chose to build a chain wall. It's cinder block on the inside and brick on the outside. Most of the other homes are on a slab. I added some vents that actually float and open in case of a flood and it knocked $800 dollars a year off my premium. So ask a lot of question before you build. Also it has never flooded here, last owner bought it in the four ties but never built, but I am in a flood zone so I pay the insurance. Mine is very low compared to 25 years ago when I built
 

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I would recommend checking with the Orange County Public Works Department to make a current determination. One thing about FEMA's Flood Insurance Rate Maps, they do change and your's did as of September 25, 2009.

Here is a portion of the FIRM Map for your area

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/716321/FM12095C0260F.pdf

A check with the building department will let you know what building codes you will need to comply with.

good luck! :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I would recommend checking with the Orange County Public Works Department to make a current determination. One thing about FEMA's Flood Insurance Rate Maps, they do change and your's did as of September 25, 2009.

Here is a portion of the FIRM Map for your area

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/716321/FM12095C0260F.pdf

A check with the building department will let you know what building codes you will need to comply with.

good luck! :thumbsup:
Thanks you for that!

According to the map you linked, it is still mostly, but not all in the zone A area. So I would assume I should treat it as a complete Zone a flood zone. I tried searching for estimates on flood insurance, but they all want heavy amounts of information, I didn't find any quick estimate to even give me an idea. I have no idea if it would be $1,000 dollars a year or $10,000 a year.
 

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the main thing of having property in a flood zone means you have certain building requirements to comply with. Your lowest floor must be above the base flood elevation. Of course the higher the floor is above the base flood elevation the lower your flood insurance is.

I'm sure it's difficult for agents to give you a price for flood insurance, it sounds like the lot is vacant. Usually you do not need flood insurance until you decide to build. They can use your design drawings and/or contract with your builder to establish a value of your building, and then the cost of the insurance.

In my area to actually purchase flood insurance you need an Elevation Certificate prepared by a professional engineer or land surveyor. If we are building on a vacant lot in a flood zone then we have to have two Elevation Certificates prepared, one for Pre-Construction (based upon the design drawings) and one Post-Construction (to indicate how it was built).

good luck! :thumbsup:
 

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but not all in the zone A area. So I would assume I should treat it as a complete Zone a flood zone.
Ask the seller if they have had the property surveyed by a professional land surveyor. If so I would expect that the surveyor indicated if there are Special Flood Hazard Zones on the property and exactly where on the lot the boundaries are.

If you are able to build outside of the SFHZ then typically you do not need Flood Insurance. Of course financial institutions can require whatever they want to require if you want their money.
 

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here is the section of the USGS (US Geological Survey) Map for your area (link below). You will notice that the area of the lot is some of the lowest elevations in the area, in fact it is anywhere from 1' to 6' lower than nearby lakes. There may be a history of the flooding in your area, thus the reason for being within a SFHZ. You could inquire of the County if there has been flooding previously and if so how often.

This hopefully gives you more information.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/716321/USGS.png
 

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In NJ and houses on piles are near the beaches. The inland but flood zone houses are on concrete footing and foundation with the ground floor as garage/utility only. I suppose people's minds are different for each region, but piles and flood make the house that much more difficult to sell.
I saw 2 houses that were near a stream. Neither were in the zone but in a depression. Both ran 2 sump pumps that kicked in every 5 minutes. One sold in 2 years in very hot town and the other is in "desirable" town but still not sold going 3+ yrs.
There is also a street in a flood zone. Nobody wants to buy so the town razed the old houses and left it as vacant lots. Perhaps that street is dying.
If you plan to spend a lot of money building a new house, I strongly discourage you building on a flood zone. It's cheap there for a reason.
 
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