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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I am doing a kitchen remodel and extending wiring for a dishwasher that is on the above mentioned breaker with a disposal. I would like to ask if the present wiring is correct....

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Menards Eaton Breaker

One 20 amp side (top breaker) has the yellow Romex 12-2 wiring that goes to a wall switch and GFCI for the disposal feed. It also feeds two smaller LED ceiling fixtures. At this switch, there is a 14-2 wiring that goes to the disposal as a direct wire.

One 20 amp side (bottom breaker) has 14-2 wire that goes non-stop to the dishwasher.

The new dishwasher going in is a Bosch and per manufacturer spec it draws 9.5 amps/1440 watts. Depending on which Badger disposal is chosen by "she who must not be ignored", the amps will be between 6.3 and 9.5.

The reason for extending the dishwasher wiring is to not drill a hole in the new floor but to bring the wire in via the same route as the existing disposal wire. I will do this extension by using a junction box nailed to the joist in the basement.

I live in Virginia if that is of any help.

Best regards and appreciate the advice.

Lou
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks...I take it that I need to use 12-2 from the circuit breaker to the dishwasher? The feed for the disposal and lights are fine as they are?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I recall a conversation with the electrician that installed this breaker some years ago. He stated the setup was permitted because of the GFCI in the one circuit. Maybe correct or maybe not his belief.

Pursuing this further so that I can learn more; attached is the .pdf from Eaton concerning the breaker and its amp configurations. Per their spec, I can use 14-8 wire, I presume this means 14 gauge wire and not sure what the -8 means other than perhaps 8 strands. I did google it but dash it all, no good answers came up.

Thus, the one 20 amp breaker of the two on that breaker has 14-2 Romex, if I add a GFCI at the end of the wire run and us a power cord/plug from the wash machine to the GFCI would that be acceptable?

Or, should I replace that 20-20 breaker with a 20-15 breaker and use the 15 amp side for the 14-2 wire?
 

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I can't see how a 15 amp circuit on a GFCI can make it OK to put on a 20 amp breaker. Kitchens are required to have 12 guage wire for appliances.
The washing machine and other plugs in the laundry room/area cannot have anything on it, including lights in the laundry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Good point there. I am attempting to understand this all, especially as the electrician put that tandem 20-20 breaker in. The spec for the breaker says 14-8 wire and that has me concerned based on what you and others have mentioned. One of the breakers starts out with 12-2 and feeds a switch for a disposal, a GFCI receptical and 3 LED ceiling fixtures. the second 20 amp has the 14-2 that goes straight to the dishwasher. It all seems to be in violation, to me, either by code or by manufacturer spec for the breaker.

I don't mind pulling in 12-2 for the dishwasher, but it would be a 10 amp appliance on a 20 amp breaker. Is that safe?

Paint me confused. :)
 

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The wire size stated on the breaker is merely the wire size range the lug will accept.
20 amp circuits are standard requirement in a kitchen. No different than a receptacle where you plugged in a low amperage device to such as a blender. The breaker only protects the building wire.
 

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I think the electrician should have used a 15-20 tandem. Maybe he didn't have one on his truck and halfassed it.

Have you confirmed that the rest of the circuit after the 12-2 continues to be 12-2 through the disposal and fixtures?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The 20 amp side has 12-2 from the breaker to the on/off switch and a GFCI at the wall for the disposal. From there there is 14-2 that feeds to the disposal and 14-2 that feed two 150 ma led fixtures and two wall recepticals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Bosch states to use 14-2 and a 15 amp breaker which I can do with existing 14-2 and a tandem 15-20. I have wondered if the 20 amp is too much for a 5 to 10 amp disposal, 2 led ceiling lights and and two wall receptical.
 

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Bosch states to use 14-2 and a 15 amp breaker which I can do with existing 14-2 and a tandem 15-20. I have wondered if the 20 amp is too much for a 5 to 10 amp disposal, 2 led ceiling lights and and two wall receptical.
Breakers are protecting wiring in the wall
 

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The size of the breaker does not determine how much power the loads will use. An alarm clock draws the same on a 15 or 20 amp circuit.
 

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A garbage disposable can have lighting on the same circuit. Not a good practice but permissible. The dishwasher can be on a 15 amp circuit. Kitchen requires at least 2 -20 amp small appliance circuits which supply countertop receptacles etc. No lightning on this circuit.
 

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The 20 amp side has 12-2 from the breaker to the on/off switch and a GFCI at the wall for the disposal. From there there is 14-2 that feeds to the disposal and 14-2 that feed two 150 ma led fixtures and two wall recepticals.
Since you have 14/2 downstream of the 12/2, it sounds like the guy should have actually used a 15-15 tandem.
 
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