DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
i have a full bath to wire with lights fan and gfci receptacles and want to know the proper pathway of current.
should i bring the dedicated line to the switch then to the lights and fan then to the gfci receptacle? i thought this so if the gfci trips the lights stay on?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
305 Posts
The lights will only go out if you wire the lights on the load side of the gfci. I usually pull two circuits for the bathroom. One 20 amp for the gfci receptacle(s) and a 15 amp circuit for the lights/fan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
ok- i dont think i have enough to pull 2 for the bathroom. i planned on just the 1 dedicated 20 is this ok?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
305 Posts
One 20 amp circuit is fine. Is everything going in one box or do you have a separate box for the outlet and switches?
 

·
Licensed Pro
Joined
·
1,571 Posts
Dedicated line in to the receptacle, continue power (from line side, not load side of the gfci) to the switch. Switched power to the light and fan from the switch box.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,363 Posts
The cable routing is entirely dependent on your layout. The way that uses the least amount of cable is the way I would do it. Just remember current code requires neutrals at the switch box.
 

·
Lic Elect/Inspector/CPO
Joined
·
369 Posts
The cable routing is entirely dependent on your layout. The way that uses the least amount of cable is the way I would do it. Just remember current code requires neutrals at the switch box.
Yes,A neutral or away to get a neutral to the box is required.
In repsonse to gwilkrrs last post
A switch may use the white conductor as a switch leg, which mean that there would be no neutral.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
305 Posts
nuetrals in the box? doesnt all wire have the nuetral (white)? what am i missing?

All cables have the white wire in them but they are not always used as a neutral. The white wire is used as a hot in a switch leg, so if you run power to a light or a receptacle, and run a single cable to a switch box, the white carries the hot to the switch and the black returns the hot to the device. The new code requires a neutral in all switch boxes. I think it has to do with all of the new switches that are lighted, timers, etc. Many of these switches require a neutral to operate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
no you cannot anymore. for my kitchen situation too, the above picture would have been easiest as far as wire running, but i had to go a different route to get a neutral in each box.
 

·
Licensed Electrical Cont.
Joined
·
7,829 Posts

·
Licensed Electrician
Joined
·
4,352 Posts
In just about every situation in my area, I can get by without a neutral in switch boxes.

Basically, the way the code reads, if there is basement below or attic above the switch, no neutral is required.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top