DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We are looking to move an existing outlet to a different breaker because it is currently on the laundry circuit, which we've heard is a no-no code-wise. This outlet is being used for a microwave.

Have located another breaker and its junction box to splice into, but after tracing all the wires, we're wondering whether we'll be overloading the circuit. The breaker itself is a two-pole, two switch (A and B) unit. A-side supplies one basement ceiling lamp, and B-side supplies 3 kitchen fixtures: 1 GFCI outlet, 1 range lamp and 1 standard duplex outlet.

It appears from checking NEC box sizing requirements, that four 12/2 lines would be the maximum to put in the junction box supplying the B side, but might this present any overload issues at the breaker?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,053 Posts
ajricks said:
We are looking to move an existing outlet to a different breaker because it is currently on the laundry circuit, which we've heard is a no-no code-wise. This outlet is being used for a microwave.

Have located another breaker and its junction box to splice into, but after tracing all the wires, we're wondering whether we'll be overloading the circuit. The breaker itself is a two-pole, two switch (A and B) unit. A-side supplies one basement ceiling lamp, and B-side supplies 3 kitchen fixtures: 1 GFCI outlet, 1 range lamp and 1 standard duplex outlet.

It appears from checking NEC box sizing requirements, that four 12/2 lines would be the maximum to put in the junction box supplying the B side, but might this present any overload issues at the breaker?
Very often a micro needs a dedicated circuit. In addition is the gfi on a counter top? If so there's another violation.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
17,158 Posts
We are looking to move an existing outlet to a different breaker because it is currently on the laundry circuit, which we've heard is a no-no code-wise. This outlet is being used for a microwave.

Have located another breaker and its junction box to splice into, but after tracing all the wires, we're wondering whether we'll be overloading the circuit. The breaker itself is a two-pole, two switch (A and B) unit. A-side supplies one basement ceiling lamp, and B-side supplies 3 kitchen fixtures: 1 GFCI outlet, 1 range lamp and 1 standard duplex outlet.

It appears from checking NEC box sizing requirements, that four 12/2 lines would be the maximum to put in the junction box supplying the B side, but might this present any overload issues at the breaker?
Do not worry about the sizing limits at this point, worry about the hack wiring job. Figure out what feeds what, and correct it. How old is this house?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
GFCI Part

Very often a micro needs a dedicated circuit. In addition is the gfi on a counter top? If so there's another violation.
Agree, the preferred scenario would be a dedicated circuit, but looking to utilize the existing circuits more efficiently.

Also appreciate your input on the kitchen, but thought GFCIs were required near countertops?? Looking at NEC 210.8(A).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,053 Posts
ajricks said:
Agree, the preferred scenario would be a dedicated circuit, but looking to utilize the existing circuits more efficiently.

Also appreciate your input on the kitchen, but thought GFCIs were required near countertops?? Looking at NEC 210.8(A).
Yes it must be a gfi if it's on the counter top however it's not allowed to share the lights that are on it, and possible not either the duplex outlet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Do not worry about the sizing limits at this point, worry about the hack wiring job. Figure out what feeds what, and correct it. How old is this house?
House built ca. 1900. 100 amp service panel prolly 20 years old. Correction to the breaker, found two other lines coming into the j/b for A-side, so we're up to three lines on each junction.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
17,158 Posts
So the wiring you think dates back 20 or so years ago. At this point, I would be going down to city hall to see if permits were pulled for the hack wiring job. What most likely happened, is that they just followed the old wiring set up, which most likely split the house originally into four loads.

Your only point if you can not easily split up, is to rip everything out and re-wire it properly, with the proper permits pulled. There is not going to be any easy way to do it, due to once you start, you will keep finding Gremlins all over the place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
After reading Code in much more detail, looks like we've run into other violations: one of the GFIs is on the refrigerator circuit which is 15-amp and has a sink light attached (scarier are the heavier burn marks on the exterior of the GFI receptacle), the other GFI previously mentioned with the range lamp also has another basement lamp attached (as well as two other lines yet to be traced through the chimney access), and the 3rd receptacle on the countertop is non-GFI. Re-designing the entire layout seems the way to go. Thanks!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
17,158 Posts
ajricks, back in the day, when the home was originally wired, it was okay to do it that way. So stating that it is not code compliant is incorrect. Now stating that it no longer fits the needs of today's homeowner and use of structure, that would be a better way of stating it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
No disrespect meant to how our brothers did things back in the day - just want to make sure it meets code today
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top