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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I need some help connecting a programmable electronic timer switch to an electronic door lock. My goal is for the door to only unlock during a set period of time (when the timer is in the "on" position).

I have found two locks that I think may work, I just have no idea what wires to connect to what.

I attached three pictures. Two of them are of the electronic timer (two different versions), and one is of the locking mechanism.

Any help is greatly appreciated.
 

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With some "electromagnetic" gizmos, if you leave power constantly applied to them, they will burn out!

So the question is...

Are these electric locks designed to have power momentarily applied? Then the power removed?
 

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Are you planning on powering the timer with the batteries? The timer might run them down fast. If you are powering the timer with a different set of batteries the hookup would be simple. Just cut either one of the wires going to the lock battery and hook each cut end to the switched contacts (1 and 2) of your picture. Make sure you order the volt free contact model (dry contacts). If using the original batteries also hook them (+ and - before the cut) to the power lugs on the correct model of timer.

As Billy_Bob suggested, make sure you don't loose your code or cause some other problem by taking the battery voltage away during non-operating periods.

If you must keep power to the lock electronics leave the battery wire as it is and just cut one of the white solenoid wires and hook it up like I mentioned above. It's hard to say what may happen to the electronics if someone tries to open the safe with the solenoid disconnected so you are on you're own here. Slight chance of damage but I thought I should mention it.
 

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That timer appears to connect to a keypad. I don't see where you can connect a contact to open it. I suppose you could rewire it so the solenoid connects direct the the power supply with the contact inline as a switch.
 

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From what I am understanding the timer is a totally seperate item and the OP wants to wire it into the lock system.
Sorry that was typed wrong. It should have said the door latch mechanism/circuit board appears to be controlled by a key pad. I do not see a connection point for a simple button/contact to release it.
 

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I believe the OP wants the lock to be capable of operating only during certain times, not unlock by itself.

If I read wrong than my ideas won't work unless they want the solenoid energized during the entire time which wouldn't be a good thing.
 

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I believe the OP wants the lock to be capable of operating only during certain times, not unlock by itself.
Never considered that option but after reading again this is probably what he wants. Put the contact on the timer in series with the battery power. That is turn the battery on and off with the timer.

If I read wrong than my ideas won't work unless they want the solenoid energized during the entire time which wouldn't be a good thing.
I thought they wanted the solenoid energized. I work with large computerized doors and we do this often, unlocking certain doors during working hours. During off hour a card reader opens them for authorized persons.
 

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I thought they wanted the solenoid energized. I work with large computerized doors and we do this often, unlocking certain doors during working hours. During off hour a card reader opens them for authorized persons.
That could be what they want and if I did your type of work that would have come to mind first.
 

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I'm not really understanding what the goal is here either. I took it as constantly energizing the solenoid, only allowing the keypad (which I assume is combination) to deenergize during specific times. But it seems like the batteries would not last long in this setup, and when they die, your solenoid drops out unlocking whatever your trying to keep locked.

I guess you could determine the load of the timer and the solenoid and have good idea of how long the batteries would last.

I would think this would work better if the lock was spring loaded and the energized solenoid did the unlocking. Actually now that I am looking at it, it kind of looks like this is what is happening. I don't know, I'm confused. Need clarification of the goal.
 

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I would actually replace the batteries with wall wart type adapter.

It is most likely the the lock would failed locked not open when the batteries died.
 

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I'm not really understanding what the goal is here either.
I wonder if the OP will ever be back? Hate threads like this with no feedback.

When I said "which wouldn't be a good thing" I was thinking about the battery running down and the solenoid getting too hot. Then I thought about it being spring loaded and it could just energize for a short period but what is the minimum time you could program. Now I'm back to thinking that the solenoid is too wimpy to move with a spring load pushing against it that is strong enough to move the locking device.

Way too much time on my hands. :laughing:
 

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I would actually replace the batteries with wall wart type adapter.

It is most likely the the lock would failed locked not open when the batteries died.
I have a small fire safe with a battery operated lock. I don't know how I would get wires into it without chopping them off when I close the door.
 

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I would actually replace the batteries with wall wart type adapter.

It is most likely the the lock would failed locked not open when the batteries died.
Nevermind....you are right. There is a big plastic housing around the keypad mounted on the front of the door on my safe. There are also 2 keys to open the safe if the battery goes dead or the keypad was destroyed in a fire. It's been a while since I used it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Hi, Sorry, I have been at work.

The goal is this:

I want to set the timer to be "on" from lets say 4pm-8pm. So only during this time, would the keypads signal to unlock the door, get sent all the way through. I basically want something that prevents the keypad from sending the signal to unlock the door unless it is during the "on" position. So a correct keypad entry at 12pm would act as if it was an incorrect entry.

I need the keypad to always be hooked up to it's battery source (4 x AA) so that it does not lose the code. So I think I have to work with the white wires in that photo. I was thinking I could power the programmable timer with a 9V battery too.

This is to the back door of my garage, I would like the battery to the timer to last, but if it dies, I can simply walk through the front door and replace it. How long do you think a 12V battery would last on a timer like this? 1 month, 6 months, more than a year? Is a 12V better for this?

So what I am thinking of doing is:
*Connect + 9V to terminal 2 on the timer
*Connect - 9V to terminal 1 on timer
*Cut 1 white wire (leave the other intact)- connect one side to terminal 3 and the other to terminal 4.

Would this work?
 

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You would have to see how much current the timer takes to run and then figure battery time. Joed has a good idea if you can use a small plug-in DC transformer to power the timer. I also see that the timer can be powered from 120 volts AC so that may be another option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Close, but you have the terminals backwards. The solenoid wire would go to 1 and 2. Where are you getting 9 volts from?
Sorry, meant to say that. Thought I numbered them differently.

I was just going to have an external 9v battery connector. I also saw some 2 x AA, 4 x AA, 6 x AA, and 8 x AA battery packs that would work. Would either of these setups last longer than just 1 9v...or 2 9v?

Thanks for all the help.
 

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Since the lock operates on 6 volts(4 AA batteries) there would be an advantage of getting a 6 volt timer. Then you could operate both them off the same supply. I would get a plug in 6 volt power pack and run them both.
 
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