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If that window is in the shower, remove it and brick up the opening. Find another location for a window or skylight. If you really, really want some light, brick up the bottom 3/4 of the window and put glass block at the top.
If you need ventilation, install a vent fan.
All that wood around the window looks original to the house, though the old mineral siding over the brick seems an odd application. But without it, that wood would be exposed to the weather.
Where is this house and how old is it? Is the construction the same with the other houses on the block?
Ron
 

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Ron6519, I have thought of replacing this shower window with a skylight and have been negotiating with a skylight installer, so I will seriously consider your suggestion. Bricking up the window might be the easiest thing to do. Although, the house was built somewhere between 1910-1930, maybe it's slightly older than that. I actually found some gas pipes for lighting in some of the walls. Anyways, the mortar is the old-fashioned kind and the mortar they are selling today isn't the right kind to use. I don't want to damage the original bricks by using the wrong mortar. And I won't be able to find bricks that look the same.
Could I use glass blocks in the entire opening? Or do you definitely recommend bricking up most or all of the opening?
I don't know how old the wood in the window frame is. It is probably original. But I think the siding was added later and they attached wood furring strips to the brick at that time, for the siding. I don't know this for sure.
I would like to remove the siding because it's ugly and it's falling off anyways. But I'm sure it's there for a reason - the bricks are spalling and the mortar is damaged in places.
The house is in The Junction neighborhood of Toronto. This neighborhood has existed since the late 1800s. Most of the houses and buildings around here look like they date from that period up to WWII. There are some newer exceptions.
Are the other houses on the block, brick? Have any of them been covered with another siding material? If not, do you see a wood buck surrounding their windows? Maybe there was a perimeter molding around the exterior hiding the wood frame. If there was , there should have been a flashing detail over the window, incorporated into the brick, to make sure water was stopped from getting in.
There should be information and supplies available to get the mortar ingrediants so they are compatable with what you have. A local mason supply outlet should have both the info and the products you need.
As to the window and brick wall, as old as it is, I would make it as waterproof as possible and remove the window totally. I don't think windows belong in a shower at all. Unless the shower is very large.
If the brick and the mortar are as deteriorated as you say, I would have the structure evaluated to see what needs to be done to fix the situation.
Exposing it to the elements might not be an option .
Ron
 
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