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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I installed a new circuit for 3 countertop outlets in a kitchenette in the basement. These have already been inspected (WA State) and passed. 2 of the outlets on one side of the J box are 120v, 20amp outlets, and the one on the other side of the J box is a GFCI outlet. They are connected to a 20amp AFCI (and GFCI? see photo) breaker. When I try to install a GFCI outlet on the other branch, it will trip every time I reset the outlet- it trips at the breaker.How can I install GFCI outlets on this side of the J box?The inspector said they were necessary despite the AFCI and what looks like ground protection at the breaker? see photos for better explanation.
 

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I have gas!
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If I'm not mistaken, a ground fault will trip an ARC fault breaker if there's a load on the circuit.
But you're saying that even without a load on the GFCI receptacle it trips the ARCI breaker? Have you tried a a non-GFCI receptacle with a load?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
But you're saying that even without a load on the GFCI receptacle it trips the ARCI breaker? Have you tried a a non-GFCI receptacle with a load?

It works fine with regular non-GFCI receptacles.


But when I try to wire in a GFCI outlet on the upstream side with 2 outlets, no loads, it trips. The inspector told me to try pig tailing the neutrals and putting them onto the GFCI receptacle. I've tried every configuration and I'm wondering if it is just because the breaker is GFCI protected. The inspector says it isn't, but it sure looks like it is to me (see the photo I attached)...
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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Your breaker is combination AFCI, is not GFCI. All receptacles on the kitchen counters must be GFCI.
If you are trying to protect the 2 receptacles with the GFCI it will not fly with the way you wired it.

COMBO AFCI means it protects against line to neutral arcs and line to ground arcs.

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you rjniles, how can I wire this circuit to work with GFCI receptacles? Why does it work for the receptacle by itself on one side of the J box and not the two on the other side?
 

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Very Stable Genius
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Outlet on far right must be wired to load side of GFI to it's left.
This includes the neutral wire. Neutral must not be tailed.

EDIT: It is not correct that a GFI will trip a AFCI....when wired
properly.

EDIT2: If problem isn't yet fixed, provide detailed drawing with
connections at each box. The block diagram really doesn't show
what you've done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I believe that is what I tried the first time, but I will try again. How likely is it that the GFCI receptacles are bad?
 

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3 different things will trip that beaker. An overcurrent, arc faults, and a ground fault over 30ma. So, which one is it?

Are you watching the LEDs for the first 5 seconds after you reset the breaker ?
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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The easiest is leave the existing GFCI by itself and add a second GFCI at the first of the other 2 receptacles.

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you all for responses. I went back to it and tried using a different GFCI receptacle wired the same way I started with (standard GFCI wiring with J box going to Line, receptacle downstream on Load) and it worked. The problem was a faulty GFCI receptacle. Tried using the faulty one downstream and only one of the 2 receptacles had power, and it was not flashing or any other sign of being faulty.
 
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