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hello all so most all my posts are DIY but looking for a little advice on painting being done by painter. Really appreciate it.
So they primed today over brand new sheetrock and spackle job( our entire house). I was wondering why i was able to see a very little of the sheetrock and spackle lines(see pic) through the prime. Not a whole lot at all but vaguely. The painted said it's not suppose to completely cover like paint would. Does that make sense? Want to make sure I'm getting the right job? I bought the Benjamin Moore fresh start which was $150 for 5 gallons

Also what size nap roller should they use when painting? Thank you very much. This is going to be our forever home so I want it to turn out good.
 

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DIY'er here, but no the primer shouldn't cover completely. I personally use a 1/2 inch nap roller. Wait for the pros to chime in.
 
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Make sure the contract said to apply two top coats!
Fresh Start is a great primer, but it's not a finish paint.
 

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Yeah, it doesn't matter what the primer looks like. That's not its job. It will soak in differently to different materials and look a little different. But that's what you want. That's why you use a primer. So it soaks in and seals everything.

I use a half inch nap roller. But I don't think there is a "right" answer to that.
 

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I use a 3/8" nap cover because I've found the texture with a 1/2" cover to be a little much. I've found a number of guys here disagree with me. Most DIYers do not load enough paint on the cover, maybe a 1/2" nap would help them in that regard. Maybe I get good results with 3/8" because I load it up well.

Please don't call it "spackle" - no contractor is ever using that.

Don't worry about the opaqueness of the primer at this point - that is not its job.
 

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I'm a DIYer and have done a lot of painting. I've always used 3/8" nap for drywall. I agree that 1/2" leaves a bit too much texture for my preferences. I also agree that many folks don't put enough paint on the roller and try to squeeze every last drop out of the roller as they apply it, which leads to marks due to the extra pressure exerted on the roller.
 

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I also agree that many folks don't put enough paint on the roller and try to squeeze every last drop out of the roller as they apply it, which leads to marks due to the extra pressure exerted on the roller.
That, plus it's a layer that dries too quickly making blending overlapping seam difficult, and it also doesn't flow or level well in general. Not to mention the fact that it doesn't hide or wear well because the dry film thickness is too low.
 

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That, plus it's a layer that dries too quickly making blending overlapping seam difficult, and it also doesn't flow or level well in general. Not to mention the fact that it doesn't hide or wear well because the dry film thickness is too low.
Took me 40 years as a diy'er to learn that lesson.
 

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That, plus it's a layer that dries too quickly making blending overlapping seam difficult, and it also doesn't flow or level well in general. Not to mention the fact that it doesn't hide or wear well because the dry film thickness is too low.
This is true. I learn this lesson a few months ago. haha
 

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3/8, 1/2 inch, it's all in what works best for you. I've tried to be a 3/8" painter, but, I get tired of all the loading and re-loading and also 3/8 tends to "skip" if you have any kind of concave area, ie, hump in drywall or plaster. Plus, I sand primer rather aggressively after it's dry so any stipple is cut way back to where if you can see it, you are looking through a magnifying glass. Sand your drywall primer, wipe the walls down with a damp sponge mop and your walls will look as smooth as a baby's butt after 2 topcoats.
 

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Personally, I never use less than a 1/2" on walls. If you use a good paint, good roller, and a good rolling technique, it will be just about as smooth as a 3/8" roller, without the hassle of using a 3/8". It takes practice and know how.... 3/8" just doesnt put enough paint down for me... I generally do a 3' wide section about half the height of the wall. Novices can make a 'W' for paint distribution, then roll it out straight up and down to even it out. Then do your lower section. Then go top to bottom the whole length, gently, to blend the top and bottom together evenly. Ive been doing it for years, so I know how to do it in one fluid motion.
 

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I generally do a 3' wide section about half the height of the wall. Novices can make a 'W' for paint distribution, then roll it out straight up and down to even it out. Then do your lower section. Then go top to bottom the whole length, gently, to blend the top and bottom together evenly. Ive been doing it for years, so I know how to do it in one fluid motion.
See, I really don't understand this approach. I'm not saying you're wrong or you don't get good results, I'm saying I don't understand it.

What I do (not when I started, but after watching some good pros) is simply roll a line straight from top to bottom. That is about 8-9 sf if you count some overlap. You are rolling 12-13 sf which takes more paint obviously. Maybe this is why 3/8" nap works for me and 1/2" works for you. I fully load the roller and that is about the right amount of paint for 8-9 sf. Probably more than most DIYers.

But it just seems that rolling one full strip up and down is easier to manage and get consistent than painting Ws and boxes all over the wall. I start a couple feet off the bottom (I don't start at the bottom or else you'd have a big blob of paint there.) I go to the top, then back down. The blob of paint left at the bottom covers the bottom 2 feet nicely. I always finish the column on a downstroke, and I don't ever flip the roller back and forth (left to right). Then I overlap and feather that seam when I do the next column. This gives the most consistent results I can imagine, aside from spraying. It never leaves an edge to dry for very long. If you paint boxes, you're always leaving an edge on there longer than you want. My edge never has longer to dry than 1 trip to the tray. The way you do it, some edges are probably drying for 3 trips to the tray or at a bare minimum 2 trips.
 

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All seems wonderful. But whether the 3/8 or 1/2, two MAIN teaching points are 1) LIFT the roller at the end of an Up down Stroke. If you keep contact....and just roll up and down...the dry points will be dry and the heavy points will be wet...since the same part of the roller is hitting the same points. Lift and all is reset. 2) you are applying paint ONTO the wall, not forcing it INTO the wall. Lighter touch prevents a lot of visible oops marks.
 

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See, I really don't understand this approach. I'm not saying you're wrong or you don't get good results, I'm saying I don't understand it.

What I do (not when I started, but after watching some good pros) is simply roll a line straight from top to bottom. That is about 8-9 sf if you count some overlap. You are rolling 12-13 sf which takes more paint obviously. Maybe this is why 3/8" nap works for me and 1/2" works for you. I fully load the roller and that is about the right amount of paint for 8-9 sf. Probably more than most DIYers.

But it just seems that rolling one full strip up and down is easier to manage and get consistent than painting Ws and boxes all over the wall. I start a couple feet off the bottom (I don't start at the bottom or else you'd have a big blob of paint there.) I go to the top, then back down. The blob of paint left at the bottom covers the bottom 2 feet nicely. I always finish the column on a downstroke, and I don't ever flip the roller back and forth (left to right). Then I overlap and feather that seam when I do the next column. This gives the most consistent results I can imagine, aside from spraying. It never leaves an edge to dry for very long. If you paint boxes, you're always leaving an edge on there longer than you want. My edge never has longer to dry than 1 trip to the tray. The way you do it, some edges are probably drying for 3 trips to the tray or at a bare minimum 2 trips.
What if you're painting a 12' high wall? youre definitely not going top to bottom with a 3/8" roller that way, especially if it was a builders flat painted heavy textured wall. Its also the same concept as painting a ceiling. And paint edges starting to dry is a non-issue. First of all, I'm not using a tray, Im using a bucket and a grid. Im also putting more paint on the wall, and Im moving fast. I'll have a wall painted in less than half the time it would take using a 3/8", so im less likely to have paint starting to dry. Ill have three feet of wall rolled out with two dunks compared to three or four it will take someone with a 3/8" Its also quicker in that im spending less time doing final strokes. Ill dunk, roll out the top, dunk, roll out the bottom, then quickly lay it off full wall length for about 3 feet.

I dont always do it in squares, but it allows for more even paint distribution. If Im using a 14" or 18" roller, Im probably going top to bottom every stroke. Also, on the 2nd coat, I will probably be going top to bottom, in about a 2 1/2" section cuz it doesnt take anywhere near as much paint, so theres that.

Are you in an area where everythings smooth wall? That might be it. Smooth wall takes a different technique. Im usually painting heavy textured walls that suck the paint up. You wouldnt be able to make it to the bottom with a 3/8." the roller would be dry. I still use a 1/2" on smooth walls too, but doing top and bottom sections are more optional that way.
 

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Quick note. This forum(I think) is for those who do something every now and again who are looking for advice as to how to do it better.....from professionals...or from those who have done it many times....but not as a profession. So while the dunk an 18” roller in a bucket is good for the professionals (although ive never seen it) , no way a dude who is just trying to get the walls in his house painted before his wife tosses him out is going to go that way. So, each to his/her own.
 

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If speed is your main concern, which it kind of sounds like it is, then why would you ever not use an 18" roller?
If Im painting more than an accent wall, I do. Nowadays, I pretty much only hang wallpaper, so I only prime, and its almost always only a wall or bathroom, and its not worth lugging that setup around to save a minute or two of time. But, with a freshly skimcoated wall, I do a top and lower section with primer, as the roller runs out of juice if I try to go top to bottom. Im not glued to this system. Sometimes go top to bottom, sometimes I do top and bottom sections. Depends on my mood, and how much paint the wall is eating up. Like I said, its not necessary with a 2nd coat, or if it already seald good with eggshell or something. The paint is more evenly distributed on the wall doing sections, either way, so I thats the way I teach people to roll walls if they dont have a good technique.
 
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