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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone help me? I covered some dark paint swatches on a wall with white water based primer and waited for it to dry for about an hour. I then painted over it with a water based paint. As the paint dried the areas where I used primer were bleeding through. I called Lowe's where I bought the primer and told them my problem; they said I did everything right according to the product label. He suggested I wait about an hour and paint another coat. I waited and painted another coat, but I still have bleed in the areas where I used primer. Does anyone know how I might remedy this problem?
 

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Just get the primer tinted close to the color your trying to paint.
 

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Is an hour what the can says to wait? That sounds fast. If all else fails, you may have to sand the original swatches off, or try a different primer. I had to layer primer and paint several times over some sticks I was painting. It finally worked, but I should have just sanded the whole mess off, as that would have been faster.
 

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Sounds like the problem may be that the primer is doing its thing but the rest of the wall needs priming. Definitely wait to see what it looks like when it is dry. It sounds like you may be trying to race your materials. Were the patches completely dry before you patched? Primer over them was dry? First coat of paint was allowed to dry? What sheen are you using, by the way. Remember that higher sheens take 30 days to fully surface cure even though they are dry to the touch fairly quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
These are all interesting observations you have made. I am using eggshell sheen on my paint. I let the primer paint dry for 1 hour as the can directed. It actually said 1/2 hour our until dry to the touch. I waited an hour. I hope priming the entire wall isn't the answer. I only had primer on a few areas, and certainly don't want to paint the entire room with primer. I am hoping for a way to re-treat the areas with primer to get them not to bleed through. If anyone can help with that it would be great. I heard another suggestion of trying grey primer. I may try that as well. Many thanks.
 

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Hard to say what is under the paint that is causing the primer to "wick" the stain through the film of the primer. I would suggest using a shellac based primer such as Cover Stain from Zinsser. It stinks to high heaven, is difficult to use, but is the best defense against stains bleeding through. I have had this happen to me numerous times in 33 years & it's just best to use the Cover Stain and be done with it. The more coats of latex primer you put on the wall, the more the stain is gonna "wick" through.
 

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Can you tell the difference between not covering or blocking out the color underneath, and actual bleeding, that means chemically transferring through the primer?
Its hard to answer with out knowing that first and then what kind of stain is coming through.
waterbase stains come through waterbase products. You can stop them dead with an oil or shellac based primer. or SOME waterbase stainkillers will let it transfer and then lock it, but needs to dry very thoroughly before recoating.

(And Gym- Cover stain is not a shellac- it's an oil...)
 

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Can anyone help me? I covered some dark paint swatches on a wall with white water based primer and waited for it to dry for about an hour. I then painted over it with a water based paint. As the paint dried the areas where I used primer were bleeding through. I called Lowe's where I bought the primer and told them my problem; they said I did everything right according to the product label. He suggested I wait about an hour and paint another coat. I waited and painted another coat, but I still have bleed in the areas where I used primer. Does anyone know how I might remedy this problem?
This doesn't sound like a big problem.
You pretty much always need 2 coats of paint. You always need 2 coats if you're covering a dissimilar color.
 

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I think we are all tripping over what the OP means by "bleeding through"? I am assuming she is seeing a difference in sheen not any sort of staining but this may be presumptuous. She says she has two coats on over the primer. I am still betting it may look better when all layers dry.
 
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