DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I purchased a 2500psi gas pressure washer from HD and spent a couple hours on the deck pressure washing it. I sprayed the deck cleaner in sections, then waited 5 - 15 minutes and then power washed. Although I'm inexperienced with a pressure washer, I knew to keep the washer moving and not get the wand too close.

The thing is, some of the paint came of extremely easy, and other parts, the paint just refused to come off. I'm looking for some tips to finish getting the paint off my deck. Should I put more deck cleaner on it, leave it sit longer, find a better brand of deck clean, find something stronger then deck cleaner, like paint thinner?

Does anyone have any experience with only 1/2 the paint coming off. I picked a section or two, and spent extra time on it, just to try to get all the paint off, by putting more cleaner on it, leaving it sit longer, and spraying it too close with the pressure washer (probably doing a little damage in the process :eek: ). But I was frustrated that ALL the paint wasn't coming off.

Please help :) :)

Thanks.








 

·
Member
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
If the paint doesn't come off, it's bonded to the surface. If you're putting a solid finish on it doesn't matter if the remainder comes off, just run a sander over it. If you want to put a clear or semi trans finish, then you have to use stripper to remove the rest, cleaner doesn't do that. That looks like paint too, I would give it a good machine sanding and put a solid stain over it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
We're back to solid stain ourselves. *pout*

We tried 2 or 3 different ptroducts to remove whatever product is there now (solid stain in grey). Just pressure washing it with cleaner will not do the trick, bt we found the stripper to work the same. (again, *pout*)

We have an over 700 sq ft deck to strip and we're finding it ridiculous to even try without having a few solid weeks to do it.

OP: Same as you, DH tried an inconspicuous spot, our 4 steps going down to the yard/grass. What a mess.

If anyone could recommend an amazing tried and true product, we might try it once more. (?) We were recommended to use Wolman deck stripper, but to find the one that is used to remove "solid" deck stain is impossible other then spending $25+ on shipping. We did also try Wolman deck stripper for stain (not solid), because I was able to find that one locally...it didnt work like we thought it should.

After applying products, letting them sit, then power washing...we're still in the same position.

:(
 

·
Member
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Diva, we're back to square one. With no disrepect intended or "told you so", this is why I told you to consider hiring a pro to at least strip the deck. It's not easy, it's time consuming, and the chemicals required to make it easier are generally not found on retail shelves. If you calculated all the time and energy you've invested to date and multiplied that by what you're time is worth, you may have, depending on the value of your time, already spent more in opportunity cost/money than a pro would have charged to strip the deck. And, after all that, the job is not done. I don't change my truck oil. I can, but it would cost me more in time and the materials needed than the 20 -25 dollars my mechanic charges me. We divide labor for a reason. Enough economics. If the stain is not peeling, it doesn't need to be removed. Strip the remaining failed stain with a pressure washing. Run a machine sander over the exposed wood to remove the dead wood. Purchase a decking solution that brightens wood and further addresses the dead wood, among other things, like SW Revive, Wolman's deck brite, etc. Then put your stain down, two coats, especially on the horzontals, or just on the horizontals even. The two main reasons decks fail are improper preparation and maintenance. Even though a deck needs retreatment every 2-3 years, it shouldn't be peeling in the interim, that's poor prep, mainly putting stain over dead wood. (Dead wood is created when the sun's UV rays destroys the lignin in the wood, which binds the wood fibers together.) I know you don't like solid stain, but short of stripping the deck you have no choice. Good Luck with it.
 

·
Stay-at-home GC
Joined
·
638 Posts
Just a quick aside.

Pressure washing is rarely suited for cleaning decks. If done professionally it leaves a nice clean deck without to many torn fibers but in the end it is damaging the wood in the deck, plain and simple.

Repeatedly pressure washing a deck will strip away the soft rings of the wood and leave the hard rings behind. Over time these hard rings become sharp ridges and can even cut bare feet. Anyone who has walked on a really old dock near water can attest.

Stiff brush, wood cleaner, elbow grease. If you pressure wash you would want to sand after.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Diva, we're back to square one. With no disrepect intended or "told you so", this is why I told you to consider hiring a pro to at least strip the deck. It's not easy, it's time consuming, and the chemicals required to make it easier are generally not found on retail shelves. If you calculated all the time and energy you've invested to date and multiplied that by what you're time is worth, you may have, depending on the value of your time, already spent more in opportunity cost/money than a pro would have charged to strip the deck. And, after all that, the job is not done. I don't change my truck oil. I can, but it would cost me more in time and the materials needed than the 20 -25 dollars my mechanic charges me. We divide labor for a reason. Enough economics. If the stain is not peeling, it doesn't need to be removed. Strip the remaining failed stain with a pressure washing. Run a machine sander over the exposed wood to remove the dead wood. Purchase a decking solution that brightens wood and further addresses the dead wood, among other things, like SW Revive, Wolman's deck brite, etc. Then put your stain down, two coats, especially on the horzontals, or just on the horizontals even. The two main reasons decks fail are improper preparation and maintenance. Even though a deck needs retreatment every 2-3 years, it shouldn't be peeling in the interim, that's poor prep, mainly putting stain over dead wood. (Dead wood is created when the sun's UV rays destroys the lignin in the wood, which binds the wood fibers together.) I know you don't like solid stain, but short of stripping the deck you have no choice. Good Luck with it.
We havent invested much time or money yet, really [nothing to compare to what the cost to have it professionally stripped would probably be, altho we havent had any estimates :confused1:- Yet] . My husband did a small step area a few times last week, an hour maybe after work, then some time after dinner. I am curious about the cost, Im guessing in the thousands but I could be wrong. Might need to make some calls.

Yeah, I wouldnt dream of either of us changing the oil either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If the paint doesn't come off, it's bonded to the surface.
I think it might be paint, not stain, although I'm not 100%


If you're putting a solid finish on it doesn't matter if the remainder comes off
At this point, a solid finish sounds like my only option. Can I use a solid stain, instead of paint?

just run a sander over it.
How much? Do I need to sand off the old paint or just make it abrasive enough to coat stain over?

The whole reason I went with the power washer was to avoid sanding 500 sq ft of deck. :(


If you want to put a clear or semi trans finish, then you have to use stripper to remove the rest, cleaner doesn't do that.
As mentioned by another poster, is there a good quality recommended brand of stripper to use, or an ingredient to look for? Can that be used with the power washer? I also don't want to spend 3 weeks sanding down my deck.


That looks like paint too, I would give it a good machine sanding and put a solid stain over it.
do I need to see bare wood, or is just scuffing the surface of the paint and matching the stain color going to work?
 

·
Member
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
I think it might be paint, not stain, although I'm not 100%




At this point, a solid finish sounds like my only option. Can I use a solid stain, instead of paint?

Yes, a solid stain can go over paint. And it would be the better option. That's probably why that failure was so bad, it doesn't look like optimal substrate for a less breathing finish. Being that close to the ground, the wood, if it's not backprimed, becomes a transfer station for ground moisture.


How much? Do I need to sand off the old paint or just make it abrasive enough to coat stain over?

As said, if the paint doesn't come off, it's bonded. The only thing you need to do is scuff the surface for the next coat to bond to.

The whole reason I went with the power washer was to avoid sanding 500 sq ft of deck. :(

Running a small hand machine over that shouldn't take too long. Use 80 weight, or maybe try 60, and just run it over. It will give a nice looking, smoother surface for the new stain. You don't need to sand any paint off.




As mentioned by another poster, is there a good quality recommended brand of stripper to use, or an ingredient to look for? Can that be used with the power washer? I also don't want to spend 3 weeks sanding down my deck.

I don't do a lot of stripping, (I'll leave that alone) so I'm not real keen on different stripping products. But from what I gather, stripping paint and stripping stain are different animals. Stripping paint is a biatch, that's why I don't do it. I'm old school, I prefer the open flame method of paint removal over chemicals, sometimes both at the same time:laughing:. It should take no more than a couple of hours to give 500 sq ft a decent sanding.



do I need to see bare wood, or is just scuffing the surface of the paint and matching the stain color going to work?
No and yes.

Edit: Sorry I mixed my answers into the questions without more differentiation.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Please provide a little detail... :001_unsure:
do I need to see bare wood, or is just scuffing the surface of the paint and matching the stain color going to work?
No and yes. You don't need to see bare wood, and yes to scuffing the surface. The scuff sanding is to to provide a "tooth" for the new finish to bond to. Supposedly, TSP etches the surface and does the same thing. I'm not totally comfortable relying on that. Just put the stain right over the surface you have pictured, after you have sanded. It will require two coats of a solid stain for uniformity and full protection of the bare wood. The stain will be fine over the painted portions provided they are prepared properly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
No and yes. You don't need to see bare wood, and yes to scuffing the surface. The scuff sanding is to to provide a "tooth" for the new finish to bond to. Supposedly, TSP etches the surface and does the same thing. I'm not totally comfortable relying on that. Just put the stain right over the surface you have pictured, after you have sanded. It will require two coats of a solid stain for uniformity and full protection of the bare wood. The stain will be fine over the painted portions provided they are prepared properly.
Thanks jsheridan. Last time I sanded down my deck, at my last house, I sanded all the way to white wood color consistently. It took forever...
At the time, I didn't realize that just scuffing the surface would be enough.

I have to admit I'm still disappointed that I need to bring out the sander at all. Would I be taking a big risk putting paint thinner or TSP on it, let soak, and spray off, without sanding? I suppose the pressure washer doesn't adequately scuff the surface?


You'll be done sanding the deck-floor in 2 hours if you rent this type of sander....
http://reliableequipmentrental.com/2010/09/orbital-sander/

Faron
The concern I'd have with such a large sander is if all the boards aren't perfectly level, it seems like this would miss spots, like close to the groves between boards, where they contact each other.

Although, I guess I could go back over obvious missed areas with the smaller hand sander.


OP has 500 sq of deck, 20x25, which breaks down to five 4x5 foot sections. How long would it take to palm/orbital sand a section with eighty or sixty weight paper? Even if you spent a half hour each, a liberal number, that comes to 2.5 hours total.

60 or 80 weight paper. got it, thanks.




Ugg... now on to sanding :cry:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
i think you should rent a floor sander.....you need to set all the nails or you will rip the paper off the machine...with the right grit paper that deck will be down to bare wood in acouple hours....remember to sand with the grain..good luck
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top