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I recently moved into a small home. Roughly 30 to 40 ounces of water accidentally got on to a laminate floor and sat there. I am also concerned that the previous owners were not diligent with maintenance and may have allowed water to get onto the floor. They may have been negligent. Cupboards and countertops were placed over laminate flooring. (I think this was a bad idea because I think water on the subfloor could spread more easily this way, and you cannot see the laminate floor underneath the cupboards anyway.) It would be a big deal to rip the flooring out from underneath the cupboards.

The previous owner may have allowed water to get under the flooring in different places. I could be at risk for mold spores. But I tend to think there is little airflow or circulation near the mold down there. It would be covered by a flooring and then by the cupboards. Nothing is kicking it up or moving it around.

I am planning on having the laminate flooring removed where it is easily accessible (i.e., anywhere except for under the counter tops). I am then going to get the exposed subfloor cleaned. I am going to glue down some vinyl flooring to replace the laminate. Without knowing if the previous owners allowed moisture to get under the counters, how much risk am I at for mold growth?

The cost for testing seems expensive compared to the cost of remediation.

I was thinking of getting an epoxy coating instead of vinyl flooring. One estimator thought I likely had asbestos in my concrete, and he advised against having someone grind the floor. The surface of the concrete looks black. One handyman said it was from an adhesive from a previous floor. I don't know if that is true or not. But some adhesives have asbestos. If the concrete had fiberglass, grinding it for an epoxy coating could be dangerous, right? I could pay for it to get tested for asbestos, but that takes time and costs money. Then I would go with vinyl flooring if grinding is not an option. The number of days it would take to get the epoxy coating would be greater than the number of days it would take to get a vinyl flooring, wouldn't it? (Layers of epoxy would have to dry.)

I like low maintenance solutions that are good in case there is a plumbing problem and water gets everywhere. I am risk averse. Am I overly concerned about mold growth? Medical doctors say mold spores can cause serious problems. Any advice?
 

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I recently moved into a small home. Roughly 30 to 40 ounces of water accidentally got on to a laminate floor and sat there. I am also concerned that the previous owners were not diligent with maintenance and may have allowed water to get onto the floor. They may have been negligent. Cupboards and countertops were placed over laminate flooring. (I think this was a bad idea because I think water on the subfloor could spread more easily this way, and you cannot see the laminate floor underneath the cupboards anyway.) It would be a big deal to rip the flooring out from underneath the cupboards.

The previous owner may have allowed water to get under the flooring in different places. I could be at risk for mold spores. But I tend to think there is little airflow or circulation near the mold down there. It would be covered by a flooring and then by the cupboards. Nothing is kicking it up or moving it around.

I am planning on having the laminate flooring removed where it is easily accessible (i.e., anywhere except for under the counter tops). I am then going to get the exposed subfloor cleaned. I am going to glue down some vinyl flooring to replace the laminate. Without knowing if the previous owners allowed moisture to get under the counters, how much risk am I at for mold growth?

The cost for testing seems expensive compared to the cost of remediation.

I was thinking of getting an epoxy coating instead of vinyl flooring. One estimator thought I likely had asbestos in my concrete, and he advised against having someone grind the floor. The surface of the concrete looks black. One handyman said it was from an adhesive from a previous floor. I don't know if that is true or not. But some adhesives have asbestos. If the concrete had fiberglass, grinding it for an epoxy coating could be dangerous, right? I could pay for it to get tested for asbestos, but that takes time and costs money. Then I would go with vinyl flooring if grinding is not an option. The number of days it would take to get the epoxy coating would be greater than the number of days it would take to get a vinyl flooring, wouldn't it? (Layers of epoxy would have to dry.)

I like low maintenance solutions that are good in case there is a plumbing problem and water gets everywhere. I am risk averse. Am I overly concerned about mold growth? Medical doctors say mold spores can cause serious problems. Any advice?
Really old black glue did have asbestos, not sure how much would be left if you only have a stain left.
You might find the flooring only goes 1/4 to 1/2" under the cupboard.
If you ever see evidence of mold coming up into the cupboards you will have to pull them, that wouldn't effect a new floor if you have that done first.
 
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