DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Aloha! I've recently purchased a home built in 1976 in the middle of nowhere Florida. This poor thing was apparently built by people who knew enough about building a house to get it to stand up this long...but I'm not sure how much longer. It's cinderblock construction outside, wood framing inside. As far as I can tell, there has never been any kind of vapor barrier installed. I know this, because a section of my bathroom floor is removed due to a leaky shower causing mold.:vs_laugh: There is not much room to move around in the crawlspace. Most places it's only about 10" from the bottom of the joists to the Earth. Professional opinion given today is: tear up the whole bathroom, replace the rusting toenailed joists with proper ones, replace subfloor with pressure treated plywood, and (of course) lay a vapor barrier before sealing up the floor.
All this sounds GREAT. Except I am not made of money.
That being said. Is it feasible/possible to sister new joists in place without removing the entire floor? As in, can it be done from below? Or, is it better to just bite the bullet and get a heloc to have everything done in one fell swoop?
The remaining flooring has some, but not much moisture damage on the underside of the subfloor. Wood is not spongy and only covered with a light dusting of mold. I am not afraid of hard work, but I am afraid of further damaging what is supposed to be my retirement home. I've got 30 years to go, but I don't wish to spend the entire time with my home in an uproar. Hindsight says I chose poorly, but I am stuck and must play the hand I was dealt.
Advice is good, constructive criticism is good.

Thank you for your time!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
153 Posts
I would spend a couple of hours each week removing dirt from under the house to get an 18" headroom, a couple of feet away from your footings so you don't disturb them. Cost: $0.
Then I would lay a sheet of polyethylene plastic on the crawlspace floor as a vapor barrier. Cost: $20
Then I would add foundation vents if you don't have any (it's okay to knock off a cement block here and there). Cost: $40
Then I would sister new P.T. joists next to the damaged ones (that won't take care of the damaged flooring above). Cost: $100.
These fixes should take care of most of your troubles.

Then I would save until I had enough money to tear off the bathroom floor and replace it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
That is pretty much the journey I had planned, but was not sure if it was feasible. Thank you for confirming my intuition is on track. Ran into a hitch today though. Discovered that both of the pedestal sinks had been installed incorrectly and...just drain right out onto the ground. Luckily I am friends with a plumber, but it's still a couple of hundred dollars I have to come up with. Heh. The joys of home ownership.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,595 Posts
Digging deeper can easily cause a pond effect then you could consider raising Salamanders. Unless the exterior drainage was nearly extreme I wouldn't recommend a water hole under it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
I would love to see pics of the house from several feet back and then a bit closer, I find this stuff interesting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,508 Posts
My brother lives in the middle of nowhere in FL. Perhaps you are neighbors.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SPS-1

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
My mom has a house located in the middle of nowhere USA as well, I think we are all neighbors. :biggrin2:
 

·
retired painter
Joined
·
10,415 Posts
I'd excavate what you need to in order to access that part of the crawlspace so you can sister/repair the floor joists. Once done I'd rake the sand back to make it all level again.


btw - I like living in the boonies as long as it doesn't take too long to get to a town for supplies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,448 Posts
Water damage is fairly obvious. Although the repair isn't and was there a need to rip things out? Rusty nail is natural part of all houses and vapor barrier, very famous, is not always necessary and over stated. Also you're in a hot zone. How much insulation and do you want insulation? Without much insulation stuffed at places, house can breathe and no need for vapor barrier, example. Willing to power ventilate the attic? Keep the house cooler.
How much experience and thinking about building practices. Maybe better to step back and think about things before you follow the "standard" practices.


Especially, if by 30 yrs, if talking about the life expectancy, want to leave the world in a built-like-a-tank house or falling apart with you, which?:smile:
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top