DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Electrician
Joined
·
1,401 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I picked up the following counter top and plan on protecting with polyurethane and have some questions.
https://www.lowes.ca/product/kitche...acacia-straight-cut-kitchen-countertop-970792

Is it necessary to give this a sand before applying the first coat?

I have quick dry poly and hope to get 3 coats on in one day. Will I need to clean the brush after each application or can I wrap the brush like I do when I paint?

Is it necessary to sand between each application and if so what is the best method to clean up the dust that will be created.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,793 Posts
Product description says 'laminate top'. You should not need the apply any finish to a laminate.
 

·
Electrician
Joined
·
1,401 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Its not a laminate top like a traditional counter top. It looks and feels like a solid piece of wood. Reading through the questions lots of people have mentioned that its not a laminate and needs to be finished.
 

·
Remodel and New Build GC
Joined
·
9,899 Posts
I picked up the following counter top and plan on protecting with polyurethane and have some questions.
https://www.lowes.ca/product/kitche...acacia-straight-cut-kitchen-countertop-970792

Is it necessary to give this a sand before applying the first coat?I sure would....it may have been treated or at least have mill contamination/glaze

I have quick dry poly and hope to get 3 coats on in one day. Will I need to clean the brush after each application or can I wrap the brush like I do when I paint?I assume it is mot a water poly. and I don't know what quick dry period is...but why not just drop it in a glass of thinner

Is it necessary to sand between each application and if so what is the best method to clean up the dust that will be created.
Somtimes not...read the instructions as to reciat times,,,,sometimes I like to go beyond recoat times and sand to just get a little better finish. Kinda depends on your ultimate objective...speed/or better finish

JMO...Good luck
 

·
Electrician
Joined
·
1,401 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Just opened the package and it says that the manufacture has pre-oiled the item.

Should I use something like linseed oil(or tung oil or teak oil) or continue with my plan for poly.

If linseed oil is easier to work with and will give a durable finish I would rather use that.
 

·
Usually Confused
Joined
·
7,255 Posts
Certainly no expert but if the counter is used for food preparation (I can recall from your other post) certain oils are not suitable. You can poly over an oiled surface.
One caution with quick drying polys is that they may show brush/pad marks. Because they dry so quickly, the finish doesn't have a chance to flow out.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,586 Posts
Just opened the package and it says that the manufacture has pre-oiled the item.

Should I use something like linseed oil(or tung oil or teak oil) or continue with my plan for poly.

If linseed oil is easier to work with and will give a durable finish I would rather use that.
You can wet sand with some 320-600 grit then apply Tung oil. Tung oil will be more durable than linseed but less durable than a polyurethane. As long as the finish is completely cured you can scuff sand with 150 then apply polyurethane.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,793 Posts
If you want a smooth finish you should do a light sanding between coats. Clean with a tack cloth or a clean soaked in mineral spirits. Recoat time will depend on the product you are using.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,151 Posts
If its preoiled, you should probably just stick to that system.

i will say, im seeing a lot of bad advice on this thread. Its meant to be oiled, so stick with a butcher block oil. Its like a cutting board. I dont know jack about butcher block oils , so no advice on what to use, but I recommend sticking to it, and disregarding most advice on this thread.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,793 Posts
I have to agree that if it has been oiled you could a problem getting poly to properly adhere.
 

·
Usually Confused
Joined
·
7,255 Posts
I dug up the OP's other post:


https://www.diychatroom.com/f14/countertop-680337/


It is to be used as a computer desk, not a food surface (well, it could be both if he uses a computer like I do). Harder protection might be warranted.
Oiling is a common method of wood treatment with or without a poly topcoat. I'm in the planning stages of building a bench out of cherry and one of the recommended finishing methods that I am considering is oil with a poly top.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,586 Posts
If its preoiled, you should probably just stick to that system.

i will say, im seeing a lot of bad advice on this thread. Its meant to be oiled, so stick with a butcher block oil. Its like a cutting board. I dont know jack about butcher block oils , so no advice on what to use, but I recommend sticking to it, and disregarding most advice on this thread.

oof I assumed it to be a drying oil used by the factory but your probably right that its just a mineral oil in which case butcherblock oil or a product like osmo top oil should be used.
 

·
Electrician
Joined
·
1,401 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thanks everyone for the advice. I ended using the polyurethane and am happy with how it looks except for the brush marks.

If your looking straight down it looks good but from an angle you can see brush strokes. This most likely is from my inexperience applying poly. I have applied 3 coats and was not planning on doing any more.

If I were to give it a sand and apply a spray on polyurethane would that help with the brush strokes in the finish?
 

·
retired painter
Joined
·
10,940 Posts
It's always a good idea to sand between coats of poly - that helps both with adhesion and eliminating or reducing brush marks. Sanding and then spraying may help, it all depends on how well you sand out the brush marks.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top