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I am trimming windows inside with only a drywall texture finish. I have five 40-60 windows. This means that i need strips of drywall about 1 inch wide by 6 foot and 1 inch by 4 foot. I'm finding this very difficult to cut and keep intact to install. Not to mention cracking when installing with screws.

Could I use plywood instead of drywall? The metal corner bead will cover almost all of it. Would plywood hold the mud and texture in the long run? or are there other suggestions how to deal with long narrow strips?
Thanks
 

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I am trimming windows inside with only a drywall texture finish. I have five 40-60 windows. This means that i need strips of drywall about 1 inch wide by 6 foot and 1 inch by 4 foot. I'm finding this very difficult to cut and keep intact to install. Not to mention cracking when installing with screws.

Could I use plywood instead of drywall? The metal corner bead will cover almost all of it. Would plywood hold the mud and texture in the long run? or are there other suggestions how to deal with long narrow strips?
Thanks
To start with, I am NOT a plasterer.

However, if you use plywood thinner than the plaster board (drywall) and apply the Finish/Topping Compound ("Mud") without applying a paper strip - as for any plaster joint - the joints will eventually crack.

I suggest that you will probably "get away with it" if you use paper tape and finish of the joints to hide the tape. Make sure that the ply is "moist", to allow the Topping Compound to adhere and not dry too fast.

You say that you are using a "drywall texture finish". I am not sure if you mean that the existing wall already has a "texture finish".
If the existing wall is smooth, it is probable that two "finish" applications will be necessary, sanding lightly between applications, with the "texture finish" applied subsequently.
 

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Yes plywood would work, since ply doesn't move like regular wood and most of it will be covered by the corner bead. Might be a good idea to prime the strips just to keep the wood from sucking the moisture out of the mud too quick which could cause cracking.
 

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I got to inspect some window wrap I put on apartments over 25 years old, good as new. Back bevel (slightly) the edge near the window- modern FG jambs may still transfer heat and you get a tight joint. We did that mainly to stop moisture from wicking to the ply from older aluminum jambs, condensing.

Gary
 
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