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Discussion Starter #1
I’m replacing the subfloor for my new bathroom project.

In the past I’ve used 2 layers of 3/4” plywood.

Base layer regular 3/4” plywood
Top layer 3/4” advantech

If I’m not installing a tub (just stand up showers) do I need 2 layers of plywood or just one?

And yes I’m sistering those joists.







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retired framer
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I’m replacing the subfloor for my new bathroom project.

In the past I’ve used 2 layers of 3/4” plywood.

Base layer regular 3/4” plywood
Top layer 3/4” advantech

If I’m not installing a tub (just stand up showers) do I need 2 layers of plywood or just one?

And yes I’m sistering those joists.






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To save plywood or? the bathtub doesn't need it.
 

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Got a real mess there.
What's up with all the notched joist that need to be sistered, and the lath that's been destroyed?
Adding layers is not going to overcome what's below it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Nealtw; said:
To save plywood or? the bathtub doesn't need it.

I thought if you had a bathtub you definitely needed 2 layers of 3/4.

I’m not installing a bath tub. Just showers.

I’d rather not stack on 2 layers unless it’s necessary.



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Discussion Starter #5
joecaption; said:
Got a real mess there.
What's up with all the notched joist that need to be sistered, and the lath that's been destroyed?
Adding layers is not going to overcome what's below it.

The plumber before just went to town notching joists.

The lath destroyed between the joists was how I found it.

And believe it or not, it’s close to level.... except one twist joisted that’s sitting low.

I’ll sister that up level



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It would be to your benefit to.

Sister in the joist.

Use two layers of ply

Bottom layer T&G and staggering the joints from top to bottom

Either 3/4" / 3/4" or 3/4" / 5/8"

People are a lot heavier these days.
 
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