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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just rebuilt a campbell frost proof yard hydrant and also added a vacuum breaker at the business end (in case I forget to detach the hose once I turn it off). I’ve come to realize that the hydrant is connected directly to my water supply line before it ever comes into my house and subsequently before it hits the main shut off. This isn’t ideal but frankly isn’t a big deal to me so long as I can crowdsource a way to test for leaks. What I’m currently thinking is:
1. Turn off main water shut off
2. Attach hose to hydrant and place other end in a bucket (securing the hose so the end is always below water)
3. Turn on hydrant and begin to fill the bucket
4. While the hydrant is on, run and turn off the water at the street valve.
5. Mark in the bucket where the water level is
5.1 wait for a period of time and see if the water level has gone down
5.1 wait for a few hours and confirm that the water level hasn’t dropped

since the bucket will be above the entire plumbing system I am testing, would relying on a siphon be enough to confirm any leaks? Would it be better if I somehow managed to pressurize the system in order to test? Thanks in advanced.
 

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I just rebuilt a campbell frost proof yard hydrant and also added a vacuum breaker at the business end (in case I forget to detach the hose once I turn it off). I’ve come to realize that the hydrant is connected directly to my water supply line before it ever comes into my house and subsequently before it hits the main shut off. This isn’t ideal but frankly isn’t a big deal to me so long as I can crowdsource a way to test for leaks. What I’m currently thinking is:
1. Turn off main water shut off
2. Attach hose to hydrant and place other end in a bucket (securing the hose so the end is always below water)
3. Turn on hydrant and begin to fill the bucket
4. While the hydrant is on, run and turn off the water at the street valve.
5. Mark in the bucket where the water level is
5.1 wait for a period of time and see if the water level has gone down
5.1 wait for a few hours and confirm that the water level hasn’t dropped

since the bucket will be above the entire plumbing system I am testing, would relying on a siphon be enough to confirm any leaks? Would it be better if I somehow managed to pressurize the system in order to test? Thanks in advanced.

To test those for leaks, I always wait to fill in the hole, with dirt, until after I thoroughly inspect the connections with the water turned on.

Then install the required gravel bed around the base, for drainage.

And then fill in the dirt, sod and or flowers.


ED
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
To test those for leaks, I always wait to fill in the hole, with dirt, until after I thoroughly inspect the connections with the water turned on.

Then install the required gravel bed around the base, for drainage.

And then fill in the dirt, sod and or flowers.


ED
That would definitely be ideal. However, I didn’t have to dig anything up to rebuild so everything that’s underground is still underground. I appreciate the response and might inquire about how you would preform a test under the circumstances you outlined? Just wait and look for leaks or some sort of pressure test?
 

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That would definitely be ideal. However, I didn’t have to dig anything up to rebuild so everything that’s underground is still underground. I appreciate the response and might inquire about how you would preform a test under the circumstances you outlined? Just wait and look for leaks or some sort of pressure test?
There is at least 25 psi pressure on a typical municipal water supply, so the wait is negligible, if there be a leak it will be visible by the time I walk from the street shutoff to the hydrant.

Curious, did you replace the rubber washer in the lowest valve in your rebuild?

ED
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There is at least 25 psi pressure on a typical municipal water supply, so the wait is negligible, if there be a leak it will be visible by the time I walk from the street shutoff to the hydrant.

Curious, did you replace the rubber washer in the lowest valve in your rebuild?

ED
Yes that's what I replaced, the rubber washer, the brass rod up top, these two flat metal connecting pieces with two holes in each, a SS bolt with a square head, and a SS piece that fits between the two flat metal pieces that the brass rod slides in and the SS bolt locks in place. The reason I believe there may be a leak is that the water supply line from the curb is a 3/4 inch copper pipe, however where the water comes into my house is a 1 1/4 inch galvanized pipe. I don't trust that a proper dielectric union was used to go from 3/4 copper to 1 1/4 steel. I also have no clue as to where that transition was done, I am assuming it is around where this hydrant is installed but it would be a PIA to dig up since it's right next to a deck and about two feet away from my foundation.
 

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Yes that's what I replaced, the rubber washer, the brass rod up top, these two flat metal connecting pieces with two holes in each, a SS bolt with a square head, and a SS piece that fits between the two flat metal pieces that the brass rod slides in and the SS bolt locks in place. The reason I believe there may be a leak is that the water supply line from the curb is a 3/4 inch copper pipe, however where the water comes into my house is a 1 1/4 inch galvanized pipe. I don't trust that a proper dielectric union was used to go from 3/4 copper to 1 1/4 steel. I also have no clue as to where that transition was done, I am assuming it is around where this hydrant is installed but it would be a PIA to dig up since it's right next to a deck and about two feet away from my foundation.

A simple way to check for a leak, is to shut off the shutoff to the house, between the hydrant and the house, then go and observe your meter, if it is still moving, there is a leak in the line between the meter and the house shutoff.

Then you will need to do the digging to find it.

If the meter is still, then you are good to go.

ED
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A simple way to check for a leak, is to shut off the shutoff to the house, between the hydrant and the house, then go and observe your meter, if it is still moving, there is a leak in the line between the meter and the house shutoff.

Then you will need to do the digging to find it.

If the meter is still, then you are good to go.

ED
that seems way simpler than my initial idea. I will give that a shot, is there any concern about the fidelity of the meter and being able to register a slow leak?
 

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that seems way simpler than my initial idea. I will give that a shot, is there any concern about the fidelity of the meter and being able to register a slow leak?

None that I am aware of, I have had a meter reader come to me and point out that there might be a slow leak in my home somewhere, and then I found a seep under a sink that was so small that it evaporated before damaging the flooring.

Depending on your meter brand and age, it should have a tenths of a gallon indicator, that will be the tattletale, to look for .


ED
 
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