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Discussion Starter #1
I have recently purchased a house built on a concrete slab. There is existing plumbing for 3 piece bath, as well as the kitchen. I plan on moving the kitchen to the other side of the house, and slightly moving the location of the bathroom.

I am trying to assess the best way to go about doing this given that its a very old home built on a concrete slab.

I do not mind putting in the work to cut through the floor and digging to give myself a level floor throughout the entire house, I am concerned that because i live in Canada, that I may have issues in the winter with freezing.

Can you help with my best options?

What my floor plan is going to look like (the table and chairs are actually a island and sink, but the software i used was free and didnt allow me to use an island with a sink)

629819



what is looks like now


629820
 

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retired framer
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It looks like you could replace it all with new under the slab. No fear of freezing there.
 

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Hammered Thumb
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Where does the sewer line enter the house?
Is there another purpose for switching the living room to the opposite side?
Where are you going to house your mechanicals (boiler/furnace, WH)
What is the grey room, and is that a stacked W/D next to it?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Where does the sewer line enter the house?
Is there another purpose for switching the living room to the opposite side?
Where are you going to house your mechanicals (boiler/furnace, WH)
What is the grey room, and is that a stacked W/D next to it?
The sewer line enter's from the outside wall in the bathroom on the lower image.

Switching the living room side allows me to house the majority of the plumbing on the left side of the house while maintaining an open concept feel from living room to kitchen.

on the lower image, the little grey room is housing the HWT, they have the washer dryer stacked in the top right corner of the kitchen right now (lower image).
I plan to house it all in the top image (top right room) minus the furnace, which I am going to have a spacepac installed in the attic to heat/cool the house.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It looks like you could replace it all with new under the slab. No fear of freezing there.
Ie. Use a diamond saw to cut the concrete, dig a small trench under the slab, run the new plumbing and replace the cut out concrete with a new pour?

I am leaning towards this option because I didn't want to deal with extra building costs in adding a raised floor, on top of loosing some head space which is limited already. My main concern there was freezing, but if that isn't a worry then I think I am about to get real dusty.
 

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Hammered Thumb
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Not a problem working on the plumbing during winter. No water, no freezing. Your concern would be how deep is it to make the run longer, and what angle does it come in, if any, which could affect where a cleanout (or the vent stack) lands if needed.

If you want an open concept, I'd remove some of the frivolous circulation and inefficient bedroom space and just keep it simple, like this:

stinson.jpg
 
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