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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a unfinished log cabin kit home and need to install indoor plumbing for the wife. It is in North Carolina which uses IPC. We have already had a 1000 gallon septic installed 15 feet behind master bedroom of the home. It is one bedroom and one bath downstairs with a full width 14 foot deep loft upstairs. The attached drawing shows only the rear half of the home which contains all the wet stuff. The 2nd story loft is supported by 4x10 beams on 30 inch center, with 2x6 tongue and groove flooring. The tub shown on the attached drawing is to be a center drain shower.
By nature of being log walls and open beam ceilings, venting of fixtures is a problem. I concidered running the stack up though the plumbing wall by the tub but this puts it out in the middle of the loft floor, and a long way from the kitchen sink. Can I possibly run my drain system as shown, with only one main vent stack in the corner of the kitchen. Also, is it a really bad idea to have the building drain turning 135 degrees?

In the future we will probably add a 1/2 bath upstairs, which could be a 3 inch stack vertically down through the plumbing wall installed by the tub shown and tied in to the building drain where ever appropriate and joining the through the roof vent in the attic. Did I totally miss the boat on this one? Thanks for your feedback.
 

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Naildriver
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I'll let the plumbers chime in on the intrinsic part of code wise installation of your plumbing. Having built log homes before, I can assure you they will settle, up to 4" over the lifespan. You have to make consideration of that settling between floors. If you have plumbing upstairs, somewhere in the plumbing wall you must use either soft copper or a bendable product to run your supply lines in a loop and you must provide a slip joint on the DWV verticals to allow for settlement.

I am not sure what stage you are at, whether it is already built or if it is a kit sitting on pallets, but settlement issues are a primary concern, even for interior walls.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'll let the plumbers chime in on the intrinsic part of code wise installation of your plumbing. Having built log homes before, I can assure you they will settle, up to 4" over the lifespan. You have to make consideration of that settling between floors. If you have plumbing upstairs, somewhere in the plumbing wall you must use either soft copper or a bendable product to run your supply lines in a loop and you must provide a slip joint on the DWV verticals to allow for settlement.

I am not sure what stage you are at, whether it is already built or if it is a kit sitting on pallets, but settlement issues are a primary concern, even for interior walls.
Thanks for your input. The logs were stacked several years ago, so there has been settlement, but we will plan for additional settlement, including slip joints and pex with ample slack in water lines.
 

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904.1 Required vent extension. The vent system serving each building drain shall have not less than one vent pipe that extends to the outdoors.


2015 IPC I would suggest venting the washer machine out the roof. Only because it is a pump discharge waste and that would be a great place to vent to air.


Why the 3-inch stack does your cabin have a second floor bath?
Also install a scd 40 clean out wye when you exit the house to septic.


Watch your distance between your tub trap and the toilet 3 inch wet vent only 6 foot as 1.5 inch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
904.1 Required vent extension. The vent system serving each building drain shall have not less than one vent pipe that extends to the outdoors.


2015 IPC I would suggest venting the washer machine out the roof. Only because it is a pump discharge waste and that would be a great place to vent to air.


Why the 3-inch stack does your cabin have a second floor bath?
Also install a scd 40 clean out wye when you exit the house to septic.


Watch your distance between your tub trap and the toilet 3 inch wet vent only 6 foot as 1.5 inch.
I labelled the 3" stack wrong. That is the one vent pipe that extends to the outdoors in my design.

Yes I forgot the requirements for a cleanout for where the building drain meets building sewer. Can this be just inside the crawl space installed to clean in the direction of drain?

A center drain shower pan is being installed vice the tub shown. I intend to install 2" scd 40 drain for the shower so the trap arm can be less than 8 feet.

On the subject of 2nd story bath, in the future we may want a 1/2 bath upstairs. My intention is to utilize the 6" interior plumbing wall shown to bring a 3" stack down and probably tie it in to the cleanout between the bathroom and Laundry, and tie the upper end into the vent pipe that extends to the outdoors up in the attic as a dry vent for the 2nd story bath group.

Thanks for you assistance.
 

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I would recommend you vent to the outside your washer drain. This is only because the washer is a pump discharge and AAV's tend to shut down under positive pressures as they are designed to do.
 

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I would recommend you vent to the outside your washer drain. This is only because the washer is a pump discharge and AAV's tend to shut down under positive pressures as they are designed to do.
when i get back to the job site I will look into that. Thanks
 
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