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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
In the master bath, there are two strips of 4-light vanity lights over each sink. Beveled mirror back with 4 globe lights and chrome.

Like this: http://www.lowes.com/pd_691774-3452...l=1&Ntt=4-light+bathroom+vanity+light+fixture

They will flicker when I have a stand alone (possibly 3 gallon) humidifier plugged into the adjoining bedroom outlets.

I don't notice the flickering with anything else plugged in, like lights or computer or a serge protector, etc.

I did replace the light switch in the bathroom two years ago before I made the humidifier connection, which didn't make a difference.

QUESTIONS

What is causing this flickering?

Is it a danger? Must it be corrected?
 

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In the master bath, there are two strips of 4-light vanity lights over each sink. Beveled mirror back with 4 globe lights and chrome.

Like this: http://www.lowes.com/pd_691774-3452...l=1&Ntt=4-light+bathroom+vanity+light+fixture

They will flicker when I have a stand alone (possibly 3 gallon) humidifier plugged into the adjoining bedroom outlets.

I don't notice the flickering with anything else plugged in, like lights or computer or a serge protector, etc.

I did replace the light switch in the bathroom two years ago before I made the humidifier connection, which didn't make a difference.

QUESTIONS

What is causing this flickering?

Is it a danger? Must it be corrected?
The lighting in question appears to be "incandescent".

If it IS "incandescent" and it "flickers" under the circumstances that you have described then it is probable that a significant problem exists somewhere.

While I do realize what a "humidifier' is, I really wonder why you need it and what a three gallon one means. (You may wish to explain that to those of us who have never found any need of such a device, what this is and why you need it.)
Quite obviously, a humidifier will need to evaporate water, which will require energy.The greater the energy required the greater will be the stress on whatever is required to supply this load.

Lights, a computer or a serge protector (nil) represent trivial "loads", as compared with something which includes a heating element.

While I cannot tell you what is causing this "flickering" it seems NOT to be a good sign, could be dangerous and needs correcting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The lighting in question appears to be "incandescent".

If it IS "incandescent" and it "flickers" under the circumstances that you have described then it is probable that a significant problem exists somewhere.

While I do realize what a "humidifier' is, I really wonder why you need it and what a three gallon one means. (You may wish to explain that to those of us who have never found any need of such a device, what this is and why you need it.)
Quite obviously, a humidifier will need to evaporate water, which will require energy.The greater the energy required the greater will be the stress on whatever is required to supply this load.

Lights, a computer or a serge protector (nil) represent trivial "loads", as compared with something which includes a heating element.

While I cannot tell you what is causing this "flickering" it seems NOT to be a good sign, could be dangerous and needs correcting.

A humidifier is a small appliance that is used to add humidity in the air. It is used by people who life in arid climates. I noted the size just to give the idea of what type of machine this is. Sort of like this. http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00V7M9YQQ/ref=psdc_7031378011_t2_B002QAYJPO

I did plug into 4 or the 5 outlets in the bedroom, which causes flickering of the bathroom vanity lights.
 

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I would take the humidifier to a different place in the house and see if it makes the incandescent lights on that other circuit flicker.

If the problem moves, then the problem is the humidifier. If the problem does not move with it, it would not necessarily eliminate it as a source, but would tend to point towards something specific to that bathroom/bedroom circuit and the humidifier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I would take the humidifier to a different place in the house and see if it makes the incandescent lights on that other circuit flicker.

If the problem moves, then the problem is the humidifier. If the problem does not move with it, it would not necessarily eliminate it as a source, but would tend to point towards something specific to that bathroom/bedroom circuit and the humidifier.
No, it only does it in the master bedroom.
 

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If it only happens on this one circuit ?
That indicates a problem with that circuit,
most likely a bad / loose / faulty connection somewhere.
YES ! It is a problem that should be seen too.
Problems like this can lead to fires.

Check all connections they should all be shiney clean & tight.
If not sure remake them all.
And avoid backstabs, use the screws instead.

:thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If it only happens on this one circuit ?
That indicates a problem with that circuit,
most likely a bad / loose / faulty connection somewhere.
YES ! It is a problem that should be seen too.
Problems like this can lead to fires.

Check all connections they should all be shiney clean & tight.
If not sure remake them all.
And avoid backstabs, use the screws instead.

:thumbup:
You mean take the wall covers off the bedroom outlets and make sure they are properly screwed in?

What is a backstab and the screw alternative.

thanks
 

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You mean take the wall covers off the bedroom outlets and make sure they are properly screwed in?

What is a backstab and the screw alternative.

thanks
Make sure that where the wires connect to the outlet,
that the wires are in good condition not oxidised and not loose,
And not look overheated or damaged.

Backstab is where the wires are just pushed into a hole on the
back of the outlet, these can become loose overtime and cause problems.
usually there is a screws as well that can be used instead of the backstabs.
the screw type connections are more reliable in the long run.
And generally better for higher current loads.

:glasses:

let us know how you go ?
 

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The black and white wires in the photo are pushed into backstabs. (The red color around then was added for some reason, most will appear similar to the empty holes on the lower half)

You would release the wires by pressing a small screwdriver blade into the slot below the holes. The white wire would go on the silver screw on the side. The black would go on the screw on the other side which should be brass.

If the were wires in the lower backstabs, they would go on the lower set of screws.
 

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I did not think a humidifier drew that much power.

You can also use a hair dryer for testing involving a heavy load.

Incandescent lamps are good for testing and troubleshooting because they dim noticeably when voltage drops.

We should not rule out loose connection in the breaker panel. For good measure it would be a good idea to tighten up all the smaller screws and set screws including at the terminal strips (bus bars) with white neutral wires and bare ground wires.

Flip off each breaker before touching the screw on it.
 

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The 1st question that needs to be asked is how old is this home? Codes for quite a while have required that the bathroom be on its own circuit separate from the bedroom circuit. If they are on separate circuits then it's very strange that something plugged into one circuit is causing problems on the other one.
 
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