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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got some great help on doing a couple smaller ceiling jobs, which I've apparently repressed the memories of as I'm planning my next job. It didn't come out terrible, but I'm glad it's not in our living room where I see it every day. Now I see why the last owner did so much texture! And working on the ceilings really sucked, still feeling it in my arms, hopefully the walls I do next will be easier.

My next project is a 12' x ~25' room. The height is going to change a little, as I will probably raise the floor to get rid of a step down, but it will be somewhere around 8'.

I'm planning on building out the end walls a little, as they don't have any windows, so that they are right around 24' wide to get a nice even number.

I am going to try and do the ceiling again, this time using 4'x12' sheets, 3 sheets across, 2 sheets deep. My wife found some ceiling treatments she liked, so if it doesn't go well I might add some beadboard or board and batten to cover up my seams!

For the walls, I'm trying to decide the best way to go about it. I've added a diagram of the longer of the walls. The first layout is 12' sheets horizontal with the butt joints lined up. I know they say to stagger, but I couldn't figure out why. Wouldn't 1 long joint from ceilng to floor be easier to mud all at once, then only have 1 butt joint on the wall?

The second layout is 12' sheets horizontal but staggering one row. An extra joint but might be the preferred method.

The third layout is 8' sheets hung vertically. I've read that this is not usually done, but also read some things that recommend it because then you have all taper joints. Of course, this would end up adding a bit more actual joint to tape.

Also, when butting the sheets up to the ceiling, is it typical to leave the taper? I'm not too worried about that joint as it will have crown added, so I thought that a butt joint there might not need much mud spread down the wall.

Thanks again for the help and inspiration!
 

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You've already summed up the pluses and minuses for each one, except that you usually don't want a 4 corner seam because it tends to highlight the full length of the butt joint, rather than spreading it out. Also in general (this is true when putting together drywall or plywood or cement board or anything really), you don't want 4 corners seams because they're not as strong. Probably doesn't make a big difference in drywall, but that joint would probably be more prone to cracking. So we basically rule out the first one.


The last one has all tapered joints, which is good, but there are slightly more linear feet of joints, which is bad. Also it's a lot easier to work across at a 4' height, than work from ceiling to floor, which involves a lot of reaching, squatting, etc. Just awkward. So most people do it the second way, even though that has a couple butt joints that are vertical. But 12' of vertical joints in the second one, and 40' in the third one.

A lot of this is personal preference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You've already summed up the pluses and minuses for each one, except that you usually don't want a 4 corner seam because it tends to highlight the full length of the butt joint, rather than spreading it out. Also in general (this is true when putting together drywall or plywood or cement board or anything really), you don't want 4 corners seams because they're not as strong. Probably doesn't make a big difference in drywall, but that joint would probably be more prone to cracking. So we basically rule out the first one.


The last one has all tapered joints, which is good, but there are slightly more linear feet of joints, which is bad. Also it's a lot easier to work across at a 4' height, than work from ceiling to floor, which involves a lot of reaching, squatting, etc. Just awkward. So most people do it the second way, even though that has a couple butt joints that are vertical. But 12' of vertical joints in the second one, and 40' in the third one.

A lot of this is personal preference.

Thanks for all the tips. Hadn't thought about floor to ceiling joints vs most at 4' high. And I can imagine the 4 corner intersection being harder. Think I'll probably go with horizontal with the staggered joints. Thanks!
 
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