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I am hanging all my own drywall in my addition; 24x24 with a cathedral ceiling, and then hiring out the finishing. One, because I need to save every dollar I can, and two because I'm on a mission to do as much as possible.

I'm wondering if the drywall pros could take a look at my problem areas, and either reassure me that the finisher should be able to take care of them, or tell me that I've created a huge mess. Again, these are my problem areas, the spots that I am most worried about. What do you think? TIA

I have my top piece to put in still, but will they be able to fix this broken area?


and my bad corner intersection...


and can I expect them to make straight corners at the ceiling?




Appreciate any advice you can give me. Cheers!
 

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You'll need to patch in a piece for the large hole. They're tapers, not magicians. You should also add pieces up in the corners.
I'm not sure if you're done screwing the sheets you have up, but they should have a consistant and uniform screw pattern. Some of the sheets are under screwed.
Ron
 

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Tired & Dirty
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Well,
You should work some filler pieces in the voids, the 4 corners really need to be properly installed with at least a stud width apart. A good mud man can fix with these mentioned fixes but it would cost ya extra if i was doing it. how much money you will save is hard to tell, maybe a heavy knock down when patched? good luck with this.
 

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I agree with Evapman. You've already increased the taping costs due to the work we're looking at. So, just how much have you saved? Or possibly cost yourself?

It is not uncommon for DIY homeowners trying to get a few bucks ahead of the game to be absolutely stunned at the additional costs they heaped upon themselves through poor or inadequate workmanship. Most construction workers will often give you a better price if you just hand them a set of plans, and touch NOTHING yourself.

Time is money. And this is especially true in drywall work. If you turn a one day job into three days for someone constantly being surprised by all sorts of things that have to be fixed so he won't be blamed for EVERYTHING, then what have you gained?

And, trust me, you and everyone else WILL blame him.

The time to come to a DIY forum is not to have your job evaluated, but to proactively gain an understanding of essentials, and develop some technical expertise long before you take unfamiliar tools in hand.
 

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All statements above are correct.

The last roof support at the wall should have been shimmed down flush with the others (that's why the gap when the factory edge of the wall sheets doesn't reach, and it was nailed way to close to the corner - the seam will open with roof flex Figure 4 + 5). Notice the nailing requirement in the article.

The paper ends are to be pulled off the sheet before installation.

On rows of sheets, the end joints never line up. (Hint: when a screw or nail breaks the paper surface, it is not counted as a fastener.)

A pro would have gone through and shimmed any low studs or rafters for plane. Did you?

When you add mega screws, please follow the recommendations for ceilings with rafters spaced 24 " o.c. as yours are. Even if you glued.

Don't expect any warranty or liability from the taper, and just pay the extra cost to hide it all effectively.

When the taper bids the job, tell him the guy doing it had a lot of fun and it was a learning experience. Don't shoot the messenger!! Be safe, GBR
 

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They're all fixer-uppers
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Wilie said it best... The mudmen may smile and tell you they're happy to take care of things, but as soon as leave the room they'll start cringing. The major caveat that mudmen would offer you is that they are only efficient when they can work as the machine they are trained to be. Its a systematic prosess and when that system breaks down, it all goes out the window. You really need to make sure you give it to the finishers with as little "repair" work to do as possible, these guys are NOT going to want to pick up a screw gun..
 

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...

...the 4 corners really need to be properly installed with at least a stud width apart.
I don't get this part of what you wrote...I'm not a drywaller but I was confused by this part of your statement. Would you mind elaborating for my own curiosity? I'm actually thinking I must be missing something here because every post I read, I tend to learn a little more!
 

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I don't get this part of what you wrote...I'm not a drywaller but I was confused by this part of your statement. Would you mind elaborating for my own curiosity? I'm actually thinking I must be missing something here because every post I read, I tend to learn a little more!
The top and bottom seams should have been staggered. You don't want to put the seams within a few feet of each other.
 

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The BUTT (4') joints should be staggered. Say you're hanging a 12' board on to. You measure from the left hand corner to the stud it will break on and hang the board. The bottom piece should be measured from the right corner and break on a stud at least 2 or 3 from the top. If that's not possible, you start with perhaps a 4' piece, hang a full sheet, and fill in the end. NEVER line the joints up! If you didn't use adhesive, you need more screws. You need to plug the LARGE holes with drywall, they can't be taped. It LOOKS like the sheet on the left in your first picture is hung backwards, as the paper from the tab is exposed. If so, the whole sheet will have to be glazed. The back paper on the drywall is much rougher than the face paper. As it stands just from the few pictures, you'd have been better off subbing out both the hanging and finishing. It can be finished, but it will definitely cost more....
 
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