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I have said this before.... I HATE attic and small closet HVAC installations in finished space. You save a little living space but the problems you set yourself up for... sheesh.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Could the clog be cleared from the drain line shown in photo? Assuming that is the secondary/emergency drain line.
Looks like a secondary drain line. Check your main drain line to see if it's clogged.
The main drain line might run down a side wall and terminate just above the ground or it could be directed into a rain gutter on the house which you might not be able to easily see from the ground. The secondary drain line which is what is probably in the picture is the emergency overflow and will have water coming from it if there is a problem with the system or the main drain line is clogged. The emergency drain line is generally placed like yours over a window where it will be easily seen. Sometimes (lousy installation) the emergency drain line will be tied into the main drain line. Find the main drain line and check for blockages. The system may possibly have a problem which has caused the emergency overflow.
The unit is built in the attic on the second floor.
 

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No, you have to clean each line separately. You generally go from the inside coil and run some bleach, and/or blow with air. I suppose you could also ream them out with a flexible wire if you had to. Sometimes the installer will leave you a tee and a removeable cap to get access. Sometimes not and the line has to be disconnected. If you haven't even looked up there to see what you have by now it is probably best to do as noted above and get a pro in. This isn't rocket science but the access and working conditions in an attic can be difficult.

Could the clog be cleared from the drain line shown in photo? Assuming that is the secondary/emergency drain line.



The unit is built in the attic on the second floor.
 

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Look for a sticker or magnet or anything that has the phone number of the person who installed it, and give them a call.

Either it is working properly ... or it isn't, but you're lucky that it is draining outside ... rather than through your finished ceilings, walls, onto hardwood floors, ...

I have seen a few of these drain lines. All depends on the humidity and how cold one sets the thermostat for how much water it pulls out. If a drain clogs ... you can lose a significant amount of flooring within a couple days before you notice it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
what are exact names of tools that I can use to clean from the attic? How do I blow air?
and I have to clean the secondary line too?
No, you have to clean each line separately. You generally go from the inside coil and run some bleach, and/or blow with air. I suppose you could also ream them out with a flexible wire if you had to. Sometimes the installer will leave you a tee and a removeable cap to get access. Sometimes not and the line has to be disconnected. If you haven't even looked up there to see what you have by now it is probably best to do as noted above and get a pro in. This isn't rocket science but the access and working conditions in an attic can be difficult.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Since the company that installed it several years ago, The hvac unit had lots of different issues. The people they send lied about fixing it , tried to deceive me, and the person taking calls at company is not expert at hvac issues and so would take at word the bs lies their workers told her.
 

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Call a different company and tell them you believe you have a clogged condensate line. But if you really want to try to take this on go up in the attic and have a look at the condensate line (s) connections and arrangement. Then take some pictures and post them here. That will make it easier for people to try to help.
 

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It did not drip when cold ac was ON before.
Yes it was, you just didn't notice.
If the cold is working, it will produce condensation.

Could the clog be cleared from the drain line shown in photo?
What clog?
You wrote that water was coming out of the pipe --- that's what its supposed to do.
It would be a problem if water was NOT coming out of the condensate drain.
 

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Some of the techs here believe this might be a secondary drain and that the primary is clogged. Would be a good idea to have that setup for attic installs to help avoid damage and serve as a telltale. Maybe even code? I dunno. But the OP seems to have very little knowledge and is in no hurry to go up and get pictures of the air handler and coil to show how the drains are set up, which we really need to see.

Yes it was, you just didn't notice.
If the cold is working, it will produce condensation.



What clog?
You wrote that water was coming out of the pipe --- that's what its supposed to do.
It would be a problem if water was NOT coming out of the condensate drain.
 

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It is almost for sure a secondary drain positioned to terminate in a place so that you will notice it dripping if the primary drain fails…. Your primary drain probably isn’t working and if you don’t address it soon you will end up with water damage near your attic hvac equipment. Just call an hvac company you trust and have them handle it for you
 

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what are exact names of tools that I can use to clean from the attic? How do I blow air?
and I have to clean the secondary line too?
Shopvac at the far end of the primary drain. If you can't find it, use a pressurized air cleaning can at the cleanout next to the air handler. (the type you can buy at electronic stores.) Use a rag to seal around the nozzle and pipe. A Shopvac there helps but isn't nearly as effective.

Secondary is clear. No need to bother it.
 
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