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Dripping is normal when the AC is running. Will drip a lot more on very humid days. And if you have a problem like the indoor evap coil icing up it can drip as it melts off with no equipment running.
 

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Yes, cold AC. The indoor evap coil gets very cold and the water condenses out of the air as it blows over it. That's how an AC system lowers your indoor humidity as it cools you house. As I said above it will drip a lot more when it gets humid. That's just the way it is.... Where are you located?

It did not drip when cold ac was ON before. Why is it dripping now when cold ac is ON?
 

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Great analogy. This is probably the level of discussion surrounding dew points that the OP will understand.

It's no different than the glass of iced tea causing a ugly stain on the fine wood furniture because of condensation . Some days maybe , some days maybe not , some days all day and all night or maybe not .
 

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Well, you probably just missed it or just didn't look on a more humid day. If it is the ac condensate drain it was dripping. Unless the line was broken or clogged and it was draining into your attic or a wall.

The question is why was it not dripping when cold ac was on during summers before?
something is not right here.
 

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It's your house, you have to tell us. Find the air handler unit with the evap coil and follow the drain line (s) from the coil. Should be 3/4" PVC or similar. I don't often see secondary lines connected, but maybe that's what you have there. Probably more important to have that setup with an attic install where a line clog could be a major problem. Imagine all that water you are seeing coming through your ceiling.

where is main drain line?
 

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Thread reminds me that I probably should give my condensate drain line (I have only one, no secondary) its every few years cleaning. It is due.
 

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I have said this before.... I HATE attic and small closet HVAC installations in finished space. You save a little living space but the problems you set yourself up for... sheesh.
 

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No, you have to clean each line separately. You generally go from the inside coil and run some bleach, and/or blow with air. I suppose you could also ream them out with a flexible wire if you had to. Sometimes the installer will leave you a tee and a removeable cap to get access. Sometimes not and the line has to be disconnected. If you haven't even looked up there to see what you have by now it is probably best to do as noted above and get a pro in. This isn't rocket science but the access and working conditions in an attic can be difficult.

Could the clog be cleared from the drain line shown in photo? Assuming that is the secondary/emergency drain line.



The unit is built in the attic on the second floor.
 

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Call a different company and tell them you believe you have a clogged condensate line. But if you really want to try to take this on go up in the attic and have a look at the condensate line (s) connections and arrangement. Then take some pictures and post them here. That will make it easier for people to try to help.
 

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Some of the techs here believe this might be a secondary drain and that the primary is clogged. Would be a good idea to have that setup for attic installs to help avoid damage and serve as a telltale. Maybe even code? I dunno. But the OP seems to have very little knowledge and is in no hurry to go up and get pictures of the air handler and coil to show how the drains are set up, which we really need to see.

Yes it was, you just didn't notice.
If the cold is working, it will produce condensation.



What clog?
You wrote that water was coming out of the pipe --- that's what its supposed to do.
It would be a problem if water was NOT coming out of the condensate drain.
 
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