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I have about an inch to make up between three newly adjusted brick piers and a 3-2x10 Beam. I know that the shim material is supposed to be non compressive and I am looking at a few metal options. It would be easier and cheaper to use wood and I have some scrap oak that would fit perfect. Are hardwoods considered non compressive if loaded along the grain? I need to make sure it's right before the building inspector stops by. Thanks for any advice .
 

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Thin trex material is friable. Don't use it to support a load. Metal shims are best. Box stores: plumbing, electrical, and lumber hangers have thin metal plates and infinitely adjustable.
 

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Welcome to the forums!

Plywood is compressible and will absorb water/moisture, as will Trex with 50% wood dough (also molds/rots). I second the grout/vb as you will then meet code minimums- BUT, always good to check with local AHJ; eg.-"
Shims for floor joist or girders shall be of hardwood or steel
plates. Shim width shall not be
less than girder width." from; http://www.rogerscounty.org/planning/zoning\AH.pdf

Gary
 
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