DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
the Musigician
Joined
·
10,404 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
i got a free piece of 1/2" thick tempered glass and want to build this outside my back porch. being as i want it with 6x6 foundation notched/bolted posts with 2x8 same, sunk down 2 ft. on concrete platforms. do it need a permit? if some freak softball-sized hail ever breaks it, i'll just plank it with 2x8 F/G... same question though, since it's permanent?
(i do intend to saw a fancier curvy bottom to the supports)

tnkx to anyone who might know.

DM
 

Attachments

·
the Musigician
Joined
·
10,404 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
it's 79+1/2" X 45" (nice beveled edges too) so i'm thinking 3 6x6's to support it ends and middle. they will be surrounded by the concrete floor too. i just didn't want to try to draw both in the sketch and chose to show the post hole in the cement instead, then decided 3 posts would probably be best?

DM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,194 Posts
The tempered glass will need complete perimeter support. It will need to be recessed into a substance that will protect the edges. You can't let it dangle with ,"T" supports. Tempered glass is very sensitive to getting hit on the edge. It will shatter in a heartbeat.
Ron
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
3,634 Posts
Have you considered using the actual benches, themselves, for "fold-up" protective coverings?

I left all the obviously necessary extra braces and stops out of these drawings for simplicity. But I think you can see how the idea works.

Of course, the table would be permanently mounted between the benches, and wouldn't slide out as I have shown it for clarity.

An especially attractive feature of sturdy, well fitting benches built like this is that a large sheet of plywood can be thrown on top of the flat and level bench backs in their folded positions, and you have a ready-made worktable for any use you choose. And the glass table remains below, safe and protected.
 

Attachments

·
the Musigician
Joined
·
10,404 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
The tempered glass will need complete perimeter support. It will need to be recessed into a substance that will protect the edges. You can't let it dangle with ,"T" supports. Tempered glass is very sensitive to getting hit on the edge. It will shatter in a heartbeat.
Ron
summagun... it has a little chip and no 'tempered' stamp, so it's pane...
the guy said it was tempered, i hadn't had time to look that closely.

DM
 

·
the Musigician
Joined
·
10,404 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
PLANS??? we don' need no steenking plans!!! lol
thanks, but why waste your time? i could build this in my sleep, dude!
i'll be adding a lock to hold it down in strong winds, and i think i'll just build the 2 part tabletop on the backs of the seats!
great idea though, thanks again!

DM
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
3,634 Posts
PLANS??? we don' need no steenking plans!!! lol
thanks, but why waste your time? i could build this in my sleep, dude!
i'll be adding a lock to hold it down in strong winds, and i think i'll just build the 2 part tabletop on the backs of the seats!
great idea though, thanks again!

DM
Sorry. :oops::blush: I sometimes forget that there are a whole heap of us who just say, "I can do that!", grab a couple of pieces of wood, and start cutting.
 

·
the Musigician
Joined
·
10,404 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
truly grateful for the idea willie!

since there's a tiny chip on the glass, i'll dado a frame for it from matching wood and PL it to the sucker.

and i think i'll use 4x4s to sink in the ground and add swing down 2x4 rear legs with 3/4" carraige bolts and large washers and wingnuts!

this should keep it neat and compact. Po)

DM
 

Attachments

·
the Musigician
Joined
·
10,404 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
now i'm confused as hell..... there's a chip in the corner, AND it's stamped tempered!!???
i've NICKED a pane of tempered and had it turn to crumbs... what's up with this one?

DM
 

·
Learning by Doing
Joined
·
3,156 Posts
BTW nice plans Willie! Sounds like a cool project DM. Ever consider painting the bench and stand in primary colors (like the diagram). Maybe just pick one color, but I think a bright paint job would really highlight the glass table.
 

·
the Musigician
Joined
·
10,404 Posts
Discussion Starter #14

·
Old School
Joined
·
3,634 Posts
i'll be using all green treated foundation grade for the wood parts, so i don't think i'll paint it at all.
but it should still look nice! i'll be cementing around all the posts when done and then i want to use an epoxy finish on the cement.
something like--> http://www.daichcoatings.com/Design Ideas Images/pages/Project49_jpg.htm
or
http://www.daichcoatings.com/Design Ideas Images/pages/Project12_jpg.htm
maybe?

DM
Danger, Will Robinson, Danger!!! :eek: I know the sun treats your wood more gently up there than it does down here, but you can almost be guaranteed of serious warping and checking (splitting) of exposed #2 pressure treated wood. Careful the inevitable twisting doesn't end up cracking your glass top.
 

·
the Musigician
Joined
·
10,404 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
??
a guy near me did a beautiful playground setup for his grandkids about ten years ago and it still looks like he did it yesterday!
foundation grade though, not 'pressure treated' stuff. there's a difference. personally, i'd like more of the jarrah and ipey to do it with to match my back porch! but i don't know if i can get any more.

DM
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
3,634 Posts
??
a guy near me did a beautiful playground setup for his grandkids about ten years ago and it still looks like he did it yesterday!
foundation grade though, not 'pressure treated' stuff. there's a difference. personally, i'd like more of the jarrah and ipey to do it with to match my back porch! but i don't know if i can get any more.

DM
Just be sure you get what you pay for. Here's some old comments off the WoodWeb:
**********************
Shrinkage of Pressure-Treated Lumber



It's delivered sopping wet, with moisture forced in under pressure. So how much does it shrink? Experts clarify the situation. July 12, 2005

Question[/size]
I am trying to calculate shrinkage of pressure treated lumber for a customer. The people where I have my wood treated say they do not know the moisture content after removing it from tank. Does anyone have a figure? Any help would be appreciated.
Forum Responses[/size]
(Sawing and Drying Forum)

From contributor D:
A lot of treated lumber is sold not dried after treatment. I would suggest buying it that way because it will shrink a lot, it may mold and stain, and it could also be a health hazard. I would recommend looking into KDAT. It will be slightly more expensive, but worth it.

From contributor B:
After pressure treating with water-borne preservatives (CA, ACQ, CCA, etc) moisture content is typically in the 45 to 90% range, depending upon treatment process used. As far as shrinkage is concerned, just assume that you are starting with fresh, green lumber. Most material is not kiln dried after treatment due to cost, real or perceived lack of customer demand and willingness to pay, lack of kilns at most treating plants, etc.

There are a number of treaters who do kiln dry after treatment and you can search for their product. Use a moisture meter with appropriate correction factor to determine the moisture content. Anticipated shrinkage can be calculated from specific gravity and moisture content change, or it can be determined from tables in the DKOM.

From the original questioner:
I am a lumber dealer, and my moisture meter will not go as high as the moisture content’s of treated. Treated has more moisture than when green, because the treatment is forced into the cells at many atmospheric pressures.

When it comes out of the tank, it is literally dripping yellow-green water. That’s why I am assuming there will b more shrinkage than the same species of pine untreated. (SPF is only treatable to refusal, which is why you do not find it on the market other than non structural items).
Most of what is sold as KDAT is foundation grade, .60, which is still the old CCA. You can purchase ACA and ACQ .25 &.40 KDAT, but I usually figure 50M. All of out treated suppliers have Kilns. Here in Michigan, most people are concerned about appearance, rather than dryness. Some architects specify KDAT, but rarely are the specifics checked, and rarely is it used, other than wood foundations and basements.

From Gene Wengert, forum technical advisor:
I have noted that often after treating to 0.6, the moisture content in the treated pieces is higher than the original "tree green" moisture content. With SYP, this means over 100% moisture content.

One problem with KDAT is that the wood will often warp excessively in the second drying. The grade however, is based on the quality after the first drying process (before treating). Hence, with KDAT, someone will have some lumber that is now not too useable.
Oftentimes, this warped lumber is still sold, based on the earlier grade, so the user now has an undesired waste factor, raising the true price above $50 per MBF to the user. This warp is not bad drying, but is just the way wood behaves. (Comments based on SYP treated with CCA.)

From the original questioner:
Thanks Gene. Warp is a huge problem in KDAT, more so in decay treated than fire retardant treated, of which all is KDAT. In the fire retardant wides, such as HEM-FIR, splits are a problem, but they are also a problem in untreated HEM-FIR. I used 99% in the shrinkage calculator, and looks like I can expect approximately 9/16" shrinkage in a 2x12. That is the figure I will present to the architect.


From Gene Wengert, forum technical advisor:
The shrinkage amount in the second drying will equal the swelling amount, approximately, when the treating was applied. So, if you have KD19 or KD15, you should get the standard size when the wood dries in use (or slightly less because in use the moisture content is a little under 19% or 15% moisture content) to about 12% moisture content.
If you have S-DRY, then you can expect more shrinkage to the final moisture content, as S-DRY is often in the 20% plus moisture content range. However, if the wood is used outside and in a more humid location, then S-DRY is 1.5" thick when planed the first time and will achieve that same size as it dries back to 20% moisture content after treating.
 

·
the Musigician
Joined
·
10,404 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
good info!

i'd like to add that KDAT stands for "kiln dried after treatment" for those who did not know.

DM
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top